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4

You don't say what you're using to edit these videos, but there may be a better chromakey plugin for your platform than what comes natively. Also, again depending on your platform, most editors will allow you to crop the key area (garbage matte) so that the green screen doesn't have to cover the entire raster, just enough to back the product you're ...


4

To reduce or eliminate the greenish reflection on the front of the table, you can buy some dark gray or black construction paper, or something equally non-reflective, cut it to size, and tape it over the 2 dark rectangles on the front of the table. I have 3 different solutions for the foot-shadows on the floor. You could point a semi-dim spotlight ...


4

There are a zillion greenscreen tutorials on YouTube. The basics are simple. 1.Pure green paint or fabric. 2.Even lighting on the green, good lighting technique on the subject. Avoid spills and shadows. 3.Use the highest quality camera, lenses and compression you have available -- but don't freak out unless you're using a lot of translucent objects like ...


3

Assuming the lighting is solid, you should be in good shape. I haven't used the keying features of iMovie, but I can give you a few tips for After Effects. I'll defer to any power users of AE's keying functionality to chime in with more specific advice. First, you'll probably want to start with the Keylight plugin (from The Foundry). It should come bundled ...


2

Depends on what your definition of good green screen is. In terms of free software to do green screen well...Only one that I can even think of that does keying is Da Vinci Lite which is free from blackmagic's website. It is pretty complex and pro based, but with a little searching around you might find what you want. I am not sure if you can technically ...


2

Even a typical lamp with a "daylight"-colored bulb in it can act as a lighting source for your product. I'm sure your boss could spring for one light bulb! If you shoot again with the new lighting, or even without the new lighting, play around with the angle of your product / camera / stool to minimize the reflections.


2

I have a couple of suggestions that could be of help: 1) Use a polarizer to reduce reflections. You say your boss won't spring for anything else, but you can pick one up fairly cheaply (like under $20 on amazon). If that's really not an option, you can try using some polarized sunglasses in front of the lens, at least to see if it eliminates the ...


1

The problem is that my alpha Mask has a feather. Which results in greeen peaking through the Mask. So the only solutions are export an alpha mask with no feather or export the original image with a black or desaturated background.


1

Part of it may be the fact you are using JPEG sequences. JPEG isn't a pixel accurate format and you are going to have some differences in block quantization that could potentially result in mismatches. I don't think that is the only issue since it is a bit too regular for it to be the only issue, but I'd try to use an intermediate format that is a bit more ...


1

I don't know if this might be an option or even work but, couldn't you get a dark piece of paper or card and create a linear curve from the bottom under the seat to extend to the floor creating a curve just at the end so it looks like part of the chair.


1

The best bet is probably a combination of more light and using a flatter exposure. h.264 in particular does very bad with noise levels in shadow as do many CMOS sensors. If you are near the dark end of what the camera can capture, you are going to get lots of noise. The obvious solution is to keep things away from the dark end of what you can capture. ...


1

What you're looking for is a difference matte. (Not to be confused with a Color Difference Key which is similar to regular chroma key.) It can certainly be done, though you should know that difference mattes are fairly temperamental. The way it works is by finding the difference between an image and each frame of video, and removing anything that's the ...


1

Fake it. Use your preferred compositing application to turn down the exposure value over a specified region. For example, if you're talking about a round spotlight affecting a flat region, create an appropriately shaped ellipse, feather it to taste, and turn down the exposure. If instead you're talking about volumetric lighting (like shining a light ...


1

What you're talking about is essentially a negative light. (There's a scene in the Simpson's where Moe doesn't want his fancy customers seeing Homer and the guys, so he unscrews a lightbulb and it casts negative light over them, leaving them in total blackness.) Unfortunately, they don't exist in real life. So your options are: Light things in such a way ...


1

I've got another idea, but it's a little kooky. You light the WHOLE SCENE with spotlights - the fewer the better. On the key spotlight, you add a gel that has an opaque black circle on it. Then as you move that around, that section of darkness will pass over parts of the set/props/actors. For a more focused spot, you could use a bright digital projector ...



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