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3

Assuming the lighting is solid, you should be in good shape. I haven't used the keying features of iMovie, but I can give you a few tips for After Effects. I'll defer to any power users of AE's keying functionality to chime in with more specific advice. First, you'll probably want to start with the Keylight plugin (from The Foundry). It should come bundled ...


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If you have a Mac, download "Cam Twist." It offers reasonable live keying, and it can even put you as picture in picture. If you use the right browser, I.e. Firefox with the Google Hangouts plugin necessary for hangouts, "Camtwist" will just be an option in the list of cameras. Download it here.


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Depends on what your definition of good green screen is. In terms of free software to do green screen well...Only one that I can even think of that does keying is Da Vinci Lite which is free from blackmagic's website. It is pretty complex and pro based, but with a little searching around you might find what you want. I am not sure if you can technically ...


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Working at this level, your best bet is probably to use a DSLR and use one of the hacks available to use them as a webcam via USB. Consumer web-cams use a very small sensor which makes it virtually impossible to get any kind of meaningful background blur. You really need the large sensor of a DSLR to best accomplish what you are looking to do.


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What you're looking for is a difference matte. (Not to be confused with a Color Difference Key which is similar to regular chroma key.) It can certainly be done, though you should know that difference mattes are fairly temperamental. The way it works is by finding the difference between an image and each frame of video, and removing anything that's the ...


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Fake it. Use your preferred compositing application to turn down the exposure value over a specified region. For example, if you're talking about a round spotlight affecting a flat region, create an appropriately shaped ellipse, feather it to taste, and turn down the exposure. If instead you're talking about volumetric lighting (like shining a light ...


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What you're talking about is essentially a negative light. (There's a scene in the Simpson's where Moe doesn't want his fancy customers seeing Homer and the guys, so he unscrews a lightbulb and it casts negative light over them, leaving them in total blackness.) Unfortunately, they don't exist in real life. So your options are: Light things in such a way ...


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I've got another idea, but it's a little kooky. You light the WHOLE SCENE with spotlights - the fewer the better. On the key spotlight, you add a gel that has an opaque black circle on it. Then as you move that around, that section of darkness will pass over parts of the set/props/actors. For a more focused spot, you could use a bright digital projector ...


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While not a direct solution, AVISynth supports creating a mask from a Chroma key using ColorKeyMask. You can then use that mask to blend the two layers together by using Mask on the top layer and then Layering them together. You could then just feed files in to the script and use FFMPEG or something similar to write out the frame stream from AVISynth. ...


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Actually, your best bet is to use a PCIe or USB 3.0 HDMI input card, like a Blackmagic Intensity, which will take the clean HDMI output of many high quality cameras (e.g: a Nikon D600 or D800, a Canon C100 or C300, etc.) and make it available to other apps on your computer. This is what professional productions do for green screen work to ensure they're ...



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