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22

Professional film productions use neither only green nor only blue for chroma keying, but switch between both depending on the scene. Each can only be used when there are no objects of the same colour in view, otherwise it takes extra work to un-remove these objects. Blue and green are the usual colours because the human skin, which is what will almost ...


9

What sorts of fabric/material give good results? Both general tips and specific examples/links are helpful. Great Resources for tips on lighting and materials: http://provideocoalition.com/index.php/alindsay/story/greenscreen_primer_part_1/ http://rebelsguide.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2432 Underexposure (not lighting enough) is your biggest enemy, ...


9

Here's what I used for my setup. Fabric/Material The main thing is to find a material that is very green. Walmart sells (at least in Maine) a very green cotton fabric that works well ($9 for 3 yards). I've tried materials that are a lighter green, but without success. One thing you have to watch out for is large wrinkles, which will quickly ruin the ...


7

Summary: Green screen work is not trivial, the quality largely depends on technique and good lighting, and at least enough space for doing the work you suggested. It does require software although iMovie bundled in most MACs has a chroma key effect (the software that allows you to composite your subject with whatever background you want including maps, other ...


6

From this green/blue screen guide: "Green chroma screens have become more and more popular in recent years, largely because green provides a brighter color channel that tends to have less noise than the blue channel. The relative brightness of green makes it a bad choice for shooting blonde hair though, which is a lot easier to key against blue ...


5

Me and my friend made one for a video project. What we did is took a white bed sheet and just painted it with basic green paint. It becomes a stiff starched fabric texture, which works well for hanging it on a wall. To light it, We used just work lights (3 100watt bulbs + unknown wattage) to light it. The lights we used were like this: We just had to play ...


4

Jonas Hummelstrand has a great guide over on his blog - General Specialist that details out a bunch of tips for it (including descriptions and pictures), I'd recommend checking that out. Ultimately the #1 key is lighting - you have to maintain a smooth and consistent lighting job on the backdrop so that the camera "sees" a consistent blue/green free from ...


3

This won't be a full answer to your question, but LearningDSLRVideo has a few clips about DIY greenscreen--more from a shooting/software standpoint, than the physical setup standpoint, though. How to Key DSLR Green Screen DSLR Green Screen Test DSLR Green Screen Test with Premiere CS5


2

I haven't tried chroma keying in Final Cut Express, but I'm pretty sure it depends on your needs and workflow. If you use Premiere for editing movies than AE should be more integrated. Yet, if you really want to get awesome results and have some spare bucks, I'd say you look at some plugins. After all neither AE nor FCE is specialized in chroma keying. ...


2

I've reflecmedia chromakey with good results using a DSLR for both stills and video, producing great easy to key files. Reflecmedia Pop up screen We plan to use this as part of our DSLR HD Video DIY Greenscreen Training course at United By Photography.


2

The Lord of the Rings used green screen. That's the last behind the scenes I've seen, however I can't imagine it being 'most' if that's the case. Looking at the wiki article there are a couple that use blue but if you think about it I imagine it all comes down to what the actor is wearing and if there are any sets pieces involved. Green may be best for ...


2

Practical or most effective? Green Screen work demands the following optimazation points to have it be effective. flat even lighting, no hot spots, no dark spots. no shadows, no reflections, the lighting has to be bight enough to register the green correctly, aka no noise. Additionally, to help avoid hot spots, plan on a fresh drywall/plasterboard for ...


2

Working at this level, your best bet is probably to use a DSLR and use one of the hacks available to use them as a webcam via USB. Consumer web-cams use a very small sensor which makes it virtually impossible to get any kind of meaningful background blur. You really need the large sensor of a DSLR to best accomplish what you are looking to do.


2

If you have a Mac, download "Cam Twist." It offers reasonable live keying, and it can even put you as picture in picture. If you use the right browser, I.e. Firefox with the Google Hangouts plugin necessary for hangouts, "Camtwist" will just be an option in the list of cameras. Download it here.


1

Actually, your best bet is to use a PCIe or USB 3.0 HDMI input card, like a Blackmagic Intensity, which will take the clean HDMI output of many high quality cameras (e.g: a Nikon D600 or D800, a Canon C100 or C300, etc.) and make it available to other apps on your computer. This is what professional productions do for green screen work to ensure they're ...


1

Wattage has nothing to do with achieving natural lighting. The amount of diffusion and placement does. More light is ALWAYS better because it results in more signal to the camera and more options as far as ISO, aperture and shutter speed. Nothing you setup with artificial lights (particularly on your budget) will come close to the level of the sun on ...


1

It depends, you can typically adjust a tolerance for the level of removal. If the colors of green are closer than the next nearest color, you should be fine, if not, then you would have to do two keys, though I would expect you should be able to stack two layers to get the necessary transparency. (Basically keying over a keyed image, since the result of a ...


1

@filzilla: once again, awesome advice. I would add Suggestion 3: With the space you're describing, you may be limited to tighter shots; I'm thinking head and shoulders with a graphic above a shoulder, or perhaps a virtual studio image in the background. What I have in my kit for similar setups is a collapsible greenscreen: ...


1

While AE has a chromakey plugin in the box, I have good experience with: http://www.redgiantsoftware.com/news/featured/KeyingSuite11/ There are several tutorials on there website, and this gave me the best results. Of course, your footage is the key


1

After Effects is well know as a finishing software. The best chroma key plug-in I saw in A.E. was keylight. Very nice full controls, to handle even color/light correction of borders key. I don't know if keylight is avaliable for FCE. Maybe the only benefit inside FCE is rendering time. Real tests can talk a lot more. My vote goes for After Effects.



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