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4

48 to 25 should be better because you have more frame information to interpolate, though the contents of the clips could also matter. If all the 48 fps clips are high speed motion while the 25 is relatively static shots, then it will probably interpolate better. The key is that frames are going to have to be guessed at and the less time that passed from ...


4

Yes, repeating every other frame works the same way at 30fps as it does at 24fps. Animating on twos is done not because it looks better, but because it means less drawing and you can 'get away' with it. Nothing stops you from drawing every frame if you want the smoothest possible motion, and nothing prevents you from repeating a frame indefinitely when ...


3

I'm not sure how it will behave at very low frame rates, but it is worth pointing out this would also limit your options on how and when you could change frames since they would have to follow on the clock cycles. What is more likely to work in this case is a long keyframe interval. The majority of frames in a compression like H.264 only store the changes ...


3

On DSLRs, a fast shutter can actually be better. DSLRs scan the image to sample rather than capturing the whole frame at once. This is why you get a distortion when you do a rapid pan. A faster shutter will result in crisper motion (less motion blur), which can seem a little harsher than the softness of film, but it also reduces the amount of distortion ...


3

You're not back to 60fps, you're still at 30fps but with every other frame discarded (or blended, or interlaced, depending on how the speedup is accomplished). When you discard every other frame, you're trading off temporal resolution. If you interlace, you're trading off spatial resolution. Either way, if this appears smoother, something's wrong with the ...


2

I disagree with the above answers. Our visual culture and the century of cinema has dictated that we evaluate a 180 degree shutter as "normal", because that is how film cameras have worked almost forever, and that is how most scenes in every movie are shot. 180 degree shutter is the same as 1 over twice the frame rate, or 1/48 for 24fps. If there is ...


2

In almost all digital video cameras there's no physical shutter, just a circuit that limits the exposure time. As long as that time allows the entire sensor to be illuminated and scanned, you should see no degradation of any individual frame. In this sense, as long as the minimum is met, there should be no visible difference between a fast shutter and an ND. ...


2

Yeah! Welcome to the good ol' world of analog television. When they originally introduced color television and put a high frequency chroma signal on top of the black- and white luma signal, they had to introduce a freqeuncy shift to prevent the signal from bleeding over into the audio .... oh, you don't want to know. Srsly! Even in times of digital video ...


2

You could use multiple cheap cameras recording at low fps, but slightly out of phase. Bennett Wilburn talks about this in his 2004 Stanford Doctoral thesis, "High Performance Imaging Using Arrays of Inexpensive Cameras".


1

Interesting question. First, here's a question for you: can your supercomputer actually calculate and render, in real time, an animated zoom on images so complex? My guess (only a guess) is that it will need more than 1/30 sec. to complete each frame (let's assume 30 frames per second as a minimal frame rate in which to achieve a smooth zoom). If that's the ...


1

This will not work because of the difference in absorption of light. The scene will look completely different lit by different colors of light and thus each of the frames will not fit together in a sequence. There is no shortcut for capturing high speed video, you need a high speed camera. You can get cameras up to about 240fps at consumer price points ...


1

There are two ways this can be accomplished. The easiest is by using a slow shutter speed. While most DSLRs may be limited to 30FPS and faster, it is possible through the use of third party firmwares to lower that arbitrarily further. As you can see from the details on Vimeo, they were using GH2s with the EOSHD Vanilla hack. This removes many of the ...


1

1080P/24 seems to be the way to go in this case. It's generally considered to have a more cinematic look and both cameras appear to support that resolution and framerate. Youtube has a 24 fps setting and should handle 1080P video fine. As you already said, use All I on your 70D to ensure highest quality.


1

24 FPS should be plenty smooth, anything about 15fps should appear fairly smooth to the human eye. There are two possibilities I can think of, first, you may be encoding to a fairly low compression format that produces large files, if so, your computer may be having trouble displaying the frames in time. This can result in lag or frame skips which make the ...


1

If you have Premiere, why not simply use Adobe Media Encoder? I believe it should handle your needs. There will always be some quality loss though as you will have to change codecs and the compression is going to differ. You can use high quality formats to minimize the loss, but there is going to be loss.


1

I'm with AJ. Unless you know the characteristics of every player that might view this, it would be unwise to rely on a small sample of test results. Using a standard frame rate like 24 fps with a keyframe interval of 24 frames will give you essentially the same thing with no compromise in compatibility. The intermediate frames will be minimally small because ...


1

My first guess would be that perhaps your screen is incapable of a 60hz refresh. If you have a slower screen refresh or frame rate, then it could result in some odd visual artifacts when trying to view the video at 60fps. As Jim described, the slowing it to 30fps and then increasing the speed is still a 30fps video, you just discarded half the frames, so ...


1

Have you tried using Quicktime Pro version 7? It's what I usually use for file conversions. It costs about £20 / $30. http://store.apple.com/uk/product/D3380Z/A/quicktime-7-pro-for-mac-os-x Open your file. Go to the file menu, and select Export Choose your format, e.g. Quicktime Movie with ProRes 422 codec at 30 fps.


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I had the same problem! So let me explain the answer : After effects imports your video at the wrong frame rate, so to fix it follow these steps : Open the Project panel (by default on the left of your screen) Right click on your footage and go to Interpret Footage -> Main... as shown below. In the screen that opens up input the desired framerate ...


1

The reason it plays back in slow-motion is because you recorded it in slow-motion mode. From Kodak's web page (my emphasis): 720p at 60 fps—for fast action and super slow motion playback Your computer have no problem playing back the video if CPU usage is just 30% and have a full frame rate of 60 fps. What you need to change this is to re-time your ...



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