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6

You will generally get the following guidance if you take courses on presentation skills (this list from write-out-loud.com) Slow speech is usually regarded as less than 110 wpm, or words per minute. Conversational speech generally falls between 120 wpm at the slow end, to 150 - 200 wpm in the fast range. People who read books for radio or podcasts are ...


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For the three main rotations of the camera you have pan (rotation around the vertical axis), tilt (rotation around the axis passing left to right through the camera), roll (rotation through the axis passing through the center of the lens). Then there are the three main movements along those same axis. Pedestal is a movement along the vertical axis. ...


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Find some people IRL who share your interest and enthusiasm for filmmaking. They don't have to be professionals, and you don't have to pay for a fancy film school, but opening a discussion with real people about technique is the best way to start learning. Watch movies with these people, press the pause button when something grabs your attention, and talk ...


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Remember its all about the story. How to tell the story. And the tools you use to tell it. Editing, lighting, special effects and sound (are the tools used to tell your story.) Remember: story, story, story. Starting out: A good entry level camera to start filming with by Tom Antos. ...


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Do you have the option to display your answer in text on the screen as you're saying it? You could probably speak faster: The viewers would be reading along anyway, so if you were unintelligible for a few words, the viewers would still get the meaning. I agree with @DrMayhem about speech speeds, but I think you can get away with 175-200 wpm and not sound ...


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There are several sources of difference, but you should be able to handle them all with some work. The first difference will be depth of field. A full frame camera has a shallower depth of field at a given angle of view because it can achieve the same angle of view with a longer lens. You can compensate for this by using a smaller aperture (higher ...


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It is specifically a rolling shutter artifact combined with a wagon wheel effect. It is simply that the scene is only illuminated for a portion of the frame read. You can actually observe the same thing in still photography when you take a flash photo above the sync speed of the camera (because the flash is not long enough to cover the full exposure and ...


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There is no "most used". You use whatever is appropriate for the exposure conditions you have and the desired aperture and shutter speed (and ISO, though turning down ISO is almost always better than using an ND filter if it is an option). The more light you have, the more wide open the aperture and the slower the shutter speed, the heavier the weight of ...


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Actors certainly have no rights to the footage itself, without other agreement, that would belong to the cameraman shooting the footage, however, just because they don't have claim to the footage doesn't mean they don't have claim to the contents of the footage. The writers most likely have copyright for the script content they produced, the director has ...


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There is one Youtube channel with tons of tutorials on simple, affordable filming techniques. I get most of my inspirations from there: http://www.youtube.com/user/filmriot



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