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summary: yes, depending on content, with a good encoder h.264 can look pretty good at 240kib/s video bitrate, at NTSC 720x480p30. With modern codecs, you don't need to downscale the rez too far. If there isn't a lot of noise in your source, you're just putting the same complexity into fewer pixels. You shouldn't encode 1080p at 270kb/s, though :P. There ...


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It takes a lot of bits to accurately, or nearly-accurately reproduce the input pixels, regardless of what they contain. The only exception is low-complexity stuff like a screen capture or animation, where big areas are EXACTLY the same colour, and/or at bit-for-bit identical from frame to frame. The difference between your intuition and real life comes ...


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After reviewing the PDF, I can confirm that you are misreading it. They are looking for a flash animation, not a video. You will not be able to use your After Effects assets at all. You need to remake the ad as a flash animation in Adobe Flash using vector graphics in order to fit within their 50KB limitation.


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At 200px by 200px, you are looking at extreme levels of limitation. You may want to consider something like a gif at that point unless you also need audio. Just audio alone for 8 seconds completely blows your 50KB bandwidth budget. 50KB is a mind numbingly small amount of data. At 8kbps, no raster video format will be usable, even at 10fps and 200 by ...


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i think MPEG Streamclip can do this. It's free on mac and pc.


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I was encountering audio sync issues when trying to do this with Avidemux, but I came upon a two-step process that keeps the audio in sync: Concatenate files using MKVToolNix (I used version 7.4.0 for Mac). This results in a Matroska video (.mkv) file. Remux the .mkv file to MP4 format using Avidemux (I used verison 2.6 for Mac). I chose the MP4v2muxer ...



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