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8

File formats are essentially wrappers, a container of sorts. The video information is encoded in a codec (Coder/Decoder). Some file formats only work with certain codecs. This is due (in part) to corporate/organizational pissing contests (or format wars - remember dvd+ vs. dvd -?). Codecs come with varying degrees of compression. The more compressed a codec ...


7

I think this image from Wikipedia says it best: AVCHD is not a codec, but it is also not just a container. Just like "every other" container, AVCHD features: Video streams Audio streams Subtitles But in addition, for example: Playlists Menu presentation (like in a DVD) Is it simply a specification that specifies a particular combination of pre-...


6

There was one, but it fell in to disuse and isn't used very often anymore, largely because of the lack of mobile support, but also due to security issues it created. It was called Flash.


6

The default settings for ffmpeg are very low quality, and since you don't specify any codec or quality parameters it's just using the defaults (I don't know why the devs don't fix that because it generates a lot of questions on forums everywhere). Try adding -c:v libx264 -crf 20 -preset slow to the command. -c:v libx264 tells it to use the libx264 ...


5

"I copy pasted Final Cut Events and Final Cut Projects folders to my external HD but I don't know how to restore it into project in FC. Any help is appreciated." It's better to perform this type of operation from within FCPX, instead of the Finder via copy/paste. With the project selected in the Project Library, choose File->Move Project... As long as you ...


4

I think the simplest way to this is to use MP4Box. ./MP4Box -add file1.mp4 -cat file2.mp4 -cat file3.mp4 output.mp4


4

Personally I always choose MP4 container and the H.264 codec as this is also the codec YouTube uses in the final video stream. What key-frame rates and compression you need really depends on the footage and it's unfortunately close to impossible to give as a generic answer for this reason. If you have a lot of movements you will need key-frames more often ...


4

Premiere Pro CS5 should be able to import H.264 video, IIRC, however it may be having trouble with the audio and/or container format. With ffmpeg try re-muxing the video stream without the audio: ffmpeg -i input -an -codec:v copy output.mp4 -an -codec:v copy output.avi If both output.mp4 and output.avi work then we know that the issue lies with the audio (...


4

It's the compression! The color resolution is a factor, but not such a big one. In this case the compression is the biggest factor. If you assume that both the 4K Edition and the 4K Cineform contain the same material, 4K Cineform contains more than 13x the information (as stated on the timescapes.org products page). But is more really better? Cineform ...


4

That looks more like a 'field' from the video, rather than a frame -- jagged diagonals are the tell. If your video is interlaced, you may only get half the vertical resolution in a still, unless you specifically set it to output a full frame. Check the export settings.


4

MP4/h264 is widely supported today. I'd even say it's the most supported video format since the existence of digital video (without having actual statistics to back that claim). There is really no reason to deliver .wmv anymore when targeting a multi platform audience, the version of Windows Media Player that came with XP doesn't support MP4 but newer ...


4

If the only difference is bitrate, then any container which accepts variable bitrate streams, will fulfill your requirement e.g. MP4, MKV..etc Step 1 is to encode your segments, ideally using the same encoder, to different bitrates with all other parameters being the same e.g. via ffmpeg, ffmpeg -ss 0 -t 5 -i input.mp4 -b:v 1000k seg1.mp4 ffmpeg -ss 5 -t ...


3

Using Quicktime Player 7 you can export any movie file as an Image Sequence Open your .mov file using Quicktime 7 File > Export In the Export dropdown select Movie to Image Sequence Open the options and set the export format (eg JPEG or PNG) If you want just the current frame leave the frames per second blank. Otherwise, enter hte videos frame rate and ...


3

Guess the original poster found his way to do it - I found the following that worked for me, even though I followed a different procedure. I didn't want to convert the MTS files before importing them to iMovie into anything else and was missing too the additional index / descripition files. this is the source and works for Sony SW / Cams. Potentially with ...


3

FCP can export an XML file that contains the basics of your sequence. Premiere can then import this and create a native project file based on the contents of that XML. I'm pretty sure Premiere can also export a similar file for import/conversion into FCP (I haven't tried though). It's worth noting that the formats are likely to change considerably years ...


3

Use Mpeg Streamclip, its an industry used conversion software that is reliable and fast, and free


3

Well, the short answer is, you can't. The longer answer: DVD uses MPEG2 compression, which is a lot less efficient than MPEG4 (aka h.264). In other words it can't get the same quality from the same file size as MPEG4 does. So you can choose: similar file size, or similar quality, but not both.


3

You should get a SWF decompiler (perhaps one of the trails for: Sothink SWF Decompiler or Decompiler SWF) and use that to find the nested movie file, and extract that.


3

Your comparison of WMV to MP4 is a little bit confusing, because you're comparing apples and oranges. MP4 is a container format, which may contain a variety of audio and video formats. Most commonly, an MP4 file will contain wither an MPEG-4 Part 10 (aka H.264) or MPEG-4 Part 2 video stream, although it can contain MPEG-2 or MPEG-1 video streams. There ...


3

The simple answer is yes for a couple of reasons: if the number of pixels is the same*, the colour depth can have a huge impact on the size. 12 bit = 4096 in decimal. So if the difference between the two formats is 13.2 (330/25) that could be easily explained as the difference between 8 bit and 12 bit is could be a 16x difference. the content on each of ...


3

MP4 with AAC audio and h.264 video is definitely playable on the PS3, and since it's an extension of Apple's .mov files, it should work on all the iDevices too. For maximum compatibility, use the h.264 'baseline' profile, and avoid AAC-HE. Older devices (like some DVD players) may require XVID video and AC3 audio in an AVI container, but that won't apply ...


3

It is likely not possible to change in camera. For power and efficiency reasons, cameras generally use dedicated encoder hardware to encode the video in real time (this is why your camera can encode h.264 video live, but when you try to encode it on your PC, it takes longer, even though your computer is far FAR more powerful.) The caveat of this is that ...


3

I can recommend Adapter. It is a Wrapper for the ffmpeg package and does its job pretty well. Because of its easy UI. You could also use ffmpeg directly via macports, but I think that Adapter is far easier to control.


3

To understand this you need to understand how codecs actually work. A plain uncompressed video frame e.g. a single picture is pretty large. I'm talking about a bitmap, not a lossless encoded video, no encoding at all, just plain pixel information. Here simple example of a Full HD frame for some perspective: We have a resolution of 1920x1080 that equals to ...


3

This isn't a phenomenon, this is compression. It is simply how it works. Compression works by taking an input, runs it through some algorithms and then gets an output that matches up either exactly (lossless) or approximately (lossy) with the original input. It is not stored like normal video data as a set of pixels, but rather some form of data that ...


3

Probably better suited for Stackoverflow but I think its still a valid question for this SE. Producing theora(ogg) versions of your videos is actually redundant. Any browser version supporting ogg is also supporting webm. For questions like these I recommend using caniuse.com. If you compare webm with ogg you quickly see that you cover the same browser ...


3

So, the answer to your question is 'yes, but...' It's perfectly feasible, but you have to create an output module with the settings that you want, and then save it to your computer. You can create this by going to Edit -> Templates -> Output Module. Click on the 'New' button in the pop-up window, and then Edit it for the settings you need (quicktime, h....


3

The University of Bath released a paper demonstrating a vector-based video codec a couple of years ago, with a press release asking "is the pixel about to die?". Strangely since then the pixel hasn't died, in fact there are even more of them around than there used to be. You could argue that most video codecs do actually use vectors: DCT (or similar), - ...


3

CMX 3600 (or earlier 340) is very common and understood by many systems. GVG (Grass Valley Group) format is almost as common. For simple cuts, dissolves and keys the two are highly compatible, but for more complex edits, including speed changes, there are significant differences. Neither deals well with multiple layers or multiple sources in one event. Many ...


3

The basics of that are actually not that complicated (while there is definitely more to know about that topic than would fit in this answer). Take a look at that graphic you can find on the w3c-website: As you can see, the container is exactly that: a container that can contain different types of media, most notably video and audio, but also captions and ...



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