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6

I think this image from Wikipedia says it best: AVCHD is not a codec, but it is also not just a container. Just like "every other" container, AVCHD features: Video streams Audio streams Subtitles But in addition, for example: Playlists Menu presentation (like in a DVD) Is it simply a specification that specifies a particular combination of ...


5

File formats are essentially wrappers, a container of sorts. The video information is encoded in a codec (Coder/Decoder). Some file formats only work with certain codecs. This is due (in part) to corporate/organizational pissing contests (or format wars - remember dvd+ vs. dvd -?). Codecs come with varying degrees of compression. The more compressed a codec ...


4

Personally I always choose MP4 container and the H.264 codec as this is also the codec YouTube uses in the final video stream. What key-frame rates and compression you need really depends on the footage and it's unfortunately close to impossible to give as a generic answer for this reason. If you have a lot of movements you will need key-frames more often ...


4

Premiere Pro CS5 should be able to import H.264 video, IIRC, however it may be having trouble with the audio and/or container format. With ffmpeg try re-muxing the video stream without the audio: ffmpeg -i input -an -codec:v copy output.mp4 -an -codec:v copy output.avi If both output.mp4 and output.avi work then we know that the issue lies with the audio ...


4

It's the compression! The color resolution is a factor, but not such a big one. In this case the compression is the biggest factor. If you assume that both the 4K Edition and the 4K Cineform contain the same material, 4K Cineform contains more than 13x the information (as stated on the timescapes.org products page). But is more really better? Cineform ...


4

"I copy pasted Final Cut Events and Final Cut Projects folders to my external HD but I don't know how to restore it into project in FC. Any help is appreciated." It's better to perform this type of operation from within FCPX, instead of the Finder via copy/paste. With the project selected in the Project Library, choose File->Move Project... As long as you ...


4

That looks more like a 'field' from the video, rather than a frame -- jagged diagonals are the tell. If your video is interlaced, you may only get half the vertical resolution in a still, unless you specifically set it to output a full frame. Check the export settings.


3

Using Quicktime Player 7 you can export any movie file as an Image Sequence Open your .mov file using Quicktime 7 File > Export In the Export dropdown select Movie to Image Sequence Open the options and set the export format (eg JPEG or PNG) If you want just the current frame leave the frames per second blank. Otherwise, enter hte videos frame rate and ...


3

Guess the original poster found his way to do it - I found the following that worked for me, even though I followed a different procedure. I didn't want to convert the MTS files before importing them to iMovie into anything else and was missing too the additional index / descripition files. this is the source and works for Sony SW / Cams. Potentially with ...


3

Use Mpeg Streamclip, its an industry used conversion software that is reliable and fast, and free


3

Well, the short answer is, you can't. The longer answer: DVD uses MPEG2 compression, which is a lot less efficient than MPEG4 (aka h.264). In other words it can't get the same quality from the same file size as MPEG4 does. So you can choose: similar file size, or similar quality, but not both.


3

Your comparison of WMV to MP4 is a little bit confusing, because you're comparing apples and oranges. MP4 is a container format, which may contain a variety of audio and video formats. Most commonly, an MP4 file will contain wither an MPEG-4 Part 10 (aka H.264) or MPEG-4 Part 2 video stream, although it can contain MPEG-2 or MPEG-1 video streams. There ...


3

The simple answer is yes for a couple of reasons: if the number of pixels is the same*, the colour depth can have a huge impact on the size. 12 bit = 4096 in decimal. So if the difference between the two formats is 13.2 (330/25) that could be easily explained as the difference between 8 bit and 12 bit is could be a 16x difference. the content on each of ...


3

MP4 with AAC audio and h.264 video is definitely playable on the PS3, and since it's an extension of Apple's .mov files, it should work on all the iDevices too. For maximum compatibility, use the h.264 'baseline' profile, and avoid AAC-HE. Older devices (like some DVD players) may require XVID video and AC3 audio in an AVI container, but that won't apply ...


3

MP4/h264 is widely supported today. I'd even say it's the most supported video format since the existence of digital video (without having actual statistics to back that claim). There is really no reason to deliver .wmv anymore when targeting a multi platform audience, the version of Windows Media Player that came with XP doesn't support MP4 but newer ...


2

You should get a SWF decompiler (perhaps one of the trails for: Sothink SWF Decompiler or Decompiler SWF) and use that to find the nested movie file, and extract that.


2

Premiere handles a lot of video formats without requiring an intermediate (editing) file, so this is an uncommon problem to have. As with other editing codec questions, I think a good place to start is by reading about the different kinds of codecs: The ProRes of Premiere Pro? It would help us understand your problem better if you could tell us what you ...


2

I find the m4v extension a bit confusing. For MPEG-2, the .m2v extension is associated with a raw video stream. Those files can have only video. Now for MPEG-4, Apple uses the .m4v extension as a container format, and in fact if you rename an .m4v file to .mp4 it is likely to play on players that only read .mp4 files, since the two format are essentially ...


2

Either Avidemux or FFMpeg+Avisynth(+Avanti) will do the job. The former should be faster to get going.


2

Likely the best solution is take your frames into a video editor, set the still pix time to about 0.23 sec for each shot as you indicated you wanted to show 150 frames in 35 seconds. 35 / 150 = 0.233333333 Set your project properties to 720p, (720 x 1280 progressive) As you have 2:1 aspect ratio there will be some letter boxing. Or a better match maybe to ...


2

FCP can export an XML file that contains the basics of your sequence. Premiere can then import this and create a native project file based on the contents of that XML. I'm pretty sure Premiere can also export a similar file for import/conversion into FCP (I haven't tried though). It's worth noting that the formats are likely to change considerably years ...


2

To be fully honest, it's impossible to tell. Even now, there's a bit of an industry battle between FCP (which is dead following FCX), Premiere and AVID. Your best bet would be to edit in Premiere and keep an ear out, upgrading every 3-4 years with Premiere and possible emigrating the project over to whatever NLE is the industry standard at that time. ...


2

I use ffmpeg for that. Just plain concat filter with stream coping works. ffmpeg -f concat -i ./file1.MTS ./file2.MTS -c copy output.avi


2

Quote: "Since WebM is a Matroska subset, mkvtoolnix should let you demux the files. It's open source, cross platform, and the author provides binaries for Windows." Source: http://superuser.com/questions/412890/lossless-extraction-of-streams-from-webm


2

I think the simplest way to this is to use MP4Box. ./MP4Box -add file1.mp4 -cat file2.mp4 -cat file3.mp4 output.mp4


2

I don't have experience with that particular Samsung camcorder, but I did do some long term recording on an older Samsung camcorder. My camcorder had a time lapse mode that allowed it to capture a frame every minute or so. It would record while plugged in to A/C power. Although the camera used the FAT32 filesystem with 2GB file limits, it was able to span ...


2

Premiere works with the source files you provide. Depending on the format it may generate a lossy copy that can be used for faster preview in the editor, but final renders will work directly from your source files. That's what's going on if you see it says it is conforming files in the lower right corner.


2

It is likely not possible to change in camera. For power and efficiency reasons, cameras generally use dedicated encoder hardware to encode the video in real time (this is why your camera can encode h.264 video live, but when you try to encode it on your PC, it takes longer, even though your computer is far FAR more powerful.) The caveat of this is that ...


2

http://www.openthefile.com/ext/mjp/4458 and http://www.fileinfo.com/extension/mjp both suggest mplayerx (http://mplayerx.org/) can play them. It would make sense to post a file for people to examine. If mplayer or ffmpeg can play them, chances are mencoder or ffmpeg can encode to the format.


2

The good news is I didn't just overlook something. Transcoding .WMV to .MOV is a real problem. The bad news is that it cost me $29 to solve it. I purchased the "Player Pro" license for Flip4Mac by Telestream after reading this support article by Apple.



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