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Yes, this is possible using ffmpeg and the mkv container. An example command sequence would be: ffmpeg -i input1 -i input2 -c copy -map 0 -map 1 output.mkv source Breaking down the command: -i input1 This selects the first input file. Could be something like my video_track1.mov. -i input2 Here you can specify the second input file. You can add another ...


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R3D files are essentially just a custom container that holds video encoded in JPEG2000 and PCM audio. Though ffmpeg only supports the RED container until version 3, not the newer version 4 (see this). You can convert RED version 3 files the same way you would convert any other video with ffmpeg. F.e. to h264 use the command below. Doesn't make much sense ...


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The issue with the frames are very likely the results of using h264 and not re-encoding the video. h264 usually doesn't have single frames (unless encoded with an intra profile) but groups of frames (GOPs), ffmpeg will cut at a keyframe position ie. at the end or beginning of a GOP. Or not in the case of your first approach, giving you issues with the ...


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An MP4 file normally contains H.264 video and AAC audio, both of which are compatible with the FLV container. You could simply copy over the streams: ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -c copy output.flv Since you're copying the streams, this will be as close to instantaneous as you're going to get and will not result in any loss of quality.


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A videofilter in ffmpeg always has to modify pixel information hence the reason why you need to re-encode. It seems logical at first that you wouldn't have to do this when cropping but the way lossy video codecs work makes this pretty impossible without re-encoding everything. They usually don't see an array of pixel information but a much more complex ...


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A container is what the name implies, a container for video data and audio data (and other misc. data). This might go a little bit under your know-how but just to make it easy to understand: A video is made up by frames which are made up by pixels. A codec like h265/HEVC is there to take this pixel information and process it in a way that makes it a lot ...


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I asked on the ffmpeg-users mailing list, and it was suggested that I add -brand 3gp6 to my encoding command. This achieved the result in mediainfo that I was looking for. However, it remains to be seen whether this really reaches the same compatibility with older hardware that YouTube's 3GP files have. I don't have any old hardware to test with, lol. ...


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A standard for WAV is 48K / 16 bit mono, or stereo if there's ambiance or presence you'd like to preserve. The last two parameters are a consequence of those choices and you can calculate them based on your selection. Then any compression you might apply afterward will have a good starting basis. If all you're after is intelligibility, a lower sample rate ...



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