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6

FFmpeg is probably being used more than you believe. I think the BBC uses it for some workflows, there is evidence that Laika and Weta may use it, and there is a fork called FFmbc which is targeted for professional broadcast usage. YouTube probably uses FFmpeg to decode as shown by some unique decoding issues (but this was several years ago that I read ...


5

From http://www.ffmpeg.org/faq.html: If you have large number of pictures to rename, you can use the following command to ease the burden. The command, using the bourne shell syntax, symbolically links all files in the current directory that match *jpg to the ‘/tmp’ directory in the sequence of ‘img001.jpg’, ‘img002.jpg’ and so on. x=1; for i in *jpg; do ...


4

using the scale filter will do it, but there is a bit more to it. ffmpeg -i input.mov -vf scale=720x406 output.mov will create a movie with the required pixel dimensions, but if you look at the output you'll find that it adds information into the metadata so that it will play back at the same aspect ratio as the original, by using non-square pixels. So ...


3

I have a large set of jpgs that I want to convert to a video losslessly You can probably just mux the jpg images: ffmpeg -r 30 -i input%03d.jpg -codec copy output.mkv Then compare the md5sums of each frame with the framemd5 muxer: $ ffmpeg -i input%03d.jpg -f framemd5 - 0, 0, 0, 1, 460800, 29bcc2db3726c7dfec1826c5740f603f ...


3

The main reason is support, usability and control. First, lets clarify that FFMPEG is an encoder, QuickTime Pro is a video utility that happens to include multiple encoders and Final Cut Pro is a non-linear editor and has nothing to do with encoders other than the fact it can output to an encoder (generally QuickTime I believe). For big budget commercial ...


3

This depends entirely on what kind of 3d video you want. There are numerous formats for 3d video. Some are as simple as placing the left and right images either side by side or one on top of the other (typically compressing them spatially to still take up the original space, for example 1080p video done like this ends up being wither 540 vertical pixels ...


2

There is no "typical" size. It depends entirely on the quality level and level of motion in the video. I could encode ten hours of video where there is no movement with very little space since the compression would work very well. On the other hand, if I had a video where every frame was completely different from the last, it would take a huge amount of ...


2

Option placement matters Is there an option I'm missing? No, but option placement matters. Options before the input apply to the input, and options before the output generally apply to the output. The exception are global options. See the FFmpeg synopsis and FFmpeg description for more details on option placement. Therefore, you must move your -q ...


2

You seem to have a fundamental misunderstanding of how video works. Video is composed of frames. You can't have millisecond precision because video doesn't have millisecond precision. If there are 30 frames per second in the video, you can only stop after one of those frames. That means your options are only every 1/30th of a second roughly. What are ...


2

I use it in my professional production chain all the time. Last week I was using it to batch through dozens of videos that needed subtitles burnt-in. It would have taken me weeks of tedious labour with Final Cut, it took me a couple of days burning the srts in with ffmpeg, and I was able to automatically rename the files and compress them for the various ...


2

concat filter This method is best if you need to perform additional filtering: Use the trim, atrim, setpts, asetpts, and concat filters: ffmpeg -i input -filter_complex \ "[0:v]trim=60:65,setpts=PTS-STARTPTS[v0]; \ [0:a]atrim=60:65,asetpts=PTS-STARTPTS[a0]; \ [0:v]trim=120:125,setpts=PTS-STARTPTS[v1]; [0:a]atrim=120:125,asetpts=PTS-STARTPTS[a1]; \ ...


2

The bands you're referring to could well just be a limitation of the 8-bit colour space. In theory the way to solve this is to use 10- or 12-bit colour space through every stage from rendering, to editing and mastering, through to output and even in the screen or projector. However your final output is probably going to be displayed in an 8 bits per ...


1

There is no switch to set a file size in percentage but there is the -fs switch. This switch can bet set to let ffmpeg try to get to a specific target file size set in bytes (for example -fs 52428800 to get to 50MB). You can write a script that takes the original file size and calculates your new desired file size depending on your specified percentage value ...


1

Capturing the video frames in XWD format then converting to PNG yields results that are almost pixel perfect when encoded with ffmpeg. Install xvidcap: mkdir -p $HOME/dev cd $HOME/dev svn checkout svn://svn.code.sf.net/p/xvidcap/code/trunk xvidcap-code cd xvidcap* ./autogen.sh LIBS="-ldl -lX11 -lXext" ./configure --prefix=/usr/local make && sudo ...


1

QTCoffee let's you edit track information in QuickTime files, but it's OS X only and donationware: $ modmovie -list clip.mov Track list for clip.mov: * Video Track * Timecode Track * Sound Track $ modmovie -disable "Sound Track" -save-in-place clip.mov If you are on OS X, and if you have QuickTime Pro (included in the pro apps), I would rather ...


1

You can create an avi animation as a series of png images ( png is lossless so the jpeg => png conversion should not degrade your pictures ): if your images a named img_0001.jpg ffmpeg -r 25 -start_number 1 -f image2 -i "img_%04d.jpg" -vcodec png video.avi where "25" is the frame rate you want in the resulting video. -start_number is not needed if it ...


1

The way I've seen this done in other systems intended for CCTV is to encode every couple of frames compressed with something like MJPEG and then stream that to the client, the server component of ffmpeg, ffserver may be able to help you with that. Of course, depending on your needs a different video codec may be more appropriate, particularly if you intend ...


1

According to Ogg specifications you can take two Ogg files and simply concatenate them together, so you can encode that single image as a single frame Ogg and then do the concatenation however you do that in your Operating System (you didn't state which one). Unfortunately, while this is completely allowed by the standard, many players will have hard time ...


1

This looks to me like an actual issue with the scripts in the preset vs your build of FFMpeg. It appears that the syntax of options being passed to the encoder are incorrect (particularly something related to "wpred" and a missing parens) and since they are not specified in your command line, I can only assume it is the preset that is the problem. I would ...



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