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If it's just a matter of which FOURCC to assign, and not the codec, then choose MP4V since it has broader compatibility, and the tag can always be changed later, using a tool like ffmpeg i.e. ffmpeg -i input.avi -c copy -map 0 -vtag DX50 tagged.avi


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Although @stib's advice is sound, I disagree with "to get an appreciable size reduction you would have to throw away a lot of quality". Cameras have to compress on-the-fly, so they use constrained baseline mode, which is to say, they skip most of the tricks that H.264 codec uses to efficiently compress videos. If space isn't a pressing concern, keep them ...


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Leave them as they are. If storage space is limited you could recompress them, but given that the files coming from the DSLR are already compressed, to get an appreciable size reduction you would have to throw away a lot of quality. As you're planning to edit them in the future - meaning another transcoding - this would be a last resort. Buy more hard ...


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You can't avoid the re-encode. They do this to be sure that every video they serve is in a standardized format, resolution and bitrate. It would be inefficient and risky to vet all diverse set of incoming files to check if they meet all their parameters, some of which are not easily available to set or tweak at the user's end.


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Strictly speaking, fourcc is the codec ID used by Microsoft. It has been adapted for use with many other formats, thus making it seem like a standardized ID format, but it's not. ffmpeg, in particular, seems to only consider XDCAM standard MPEG2 for inclusion in MOV. From the source code: else if (track->enc->codec_id == AV_CODEC_ID_MPEG2VIDEO) ...


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Unfortunately I couldn't find it in Adobe Encoder preferences - there is no such settings, and by default it loads 30fps sequence. You can change the default in Media Encoder by going to the Preferences/Media and then change "Indeterminate Media Timebase"


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When you export with h.264 in Premiere it has two bars as you show. A target bitrate, and a maximum bitrate. The target bitrate is after all, only a target, and if your video doesn't have enough movement or fast action then you won't get the full Mbps that you've set. Even lowering it enough to only export 12Mbps because your video doesn't have a lot of ...


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You should upload the highest quality your tubes can afford. The current YouTube help text on uploads is misleading. It states: Your videos will process faster if you encode into a streamable file format. For more information, visit our Help Center. It contradicts what Colleen Henry, formerly of Google, now at Facebook said: Colleen Henry, Video ...


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I would get as far away from EE as possible. Using the x264 tool, and mp4box, you can convert and segment out the files which are ready to be streamed to any dash compatible players. Especially since you mentioned using batch scripts, this is a great solution I think. This is a good guide: ...


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If you’re up for building your own server, and have some coding skill, then you could look at setting up a nginx server running the RTMP extension that can capture an re-stream live or on demand video. It can also do near realtime transcoding or "at completion of capture" transcoding using ffmpeg. For the system I setup, I send live video in using an IP ...



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