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I really don't see what the problem is? In adobe premiere pro, I had done a rough cut of my niece having tea. I added the title screen after, so I just shifted the clips along the timeline to give some extra space at the beginning of the video. The source clips were all .mts file formats, no need to re-encode. You can see the result here. ...


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On Windows, I recommend FootageStudio 4K. It is a commercial converter (not cheap) that supports many professional formats, including ProRes.


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Ffmpeg can encode video using ProRes, and runs cross-platform ffmpeg -i input.avi -c:v prores -profile:v 3 -c:a pcm_s16le output.mov will do the trick.


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You can try ffmbc - a customized version of FFmpeg. Unfortunately there are no builds for linux or windows at the moment so you have compile it yourself.


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It depends a bit on your file format. But it is possible; if you create a title as a separate video you can concatenate (join) the title and the original video usng tools such as ffmpeg. Generally this will work best if they are the same codec with the same settings. For concatenation using ffmpeg see the FAQ. Some formats, like MPEG2 program streams (like ...


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Unfortunately, because of the fact that most modern video compression algorithms don't work on single pixels, but rather groups of pixels (often called blocks), it will not be possible to change the values of select pixels (such as by adding a title) without re-encoding the video or using a format that supports an overlay. For simply re-encoding, if size is ...


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To elaborate a little further on what Peter says, in general using multiple processors helps in cases where you have several independent tasks that all need to be done but don't have dependencies on each other, or one task where you're performing the same math on massive amounts of data. If, however, you need to the output of calculation A as the input of ...


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The article you linked is not very good. Normally, single pass bitrate encodings convert your bitrate into a RF value with a maximum bitrate limit and takes it from there. x264's one-pass ABR ratecontrol is not implemented as CRF + limit. He's right that 2pass is by far the best way to hit a target bitrate, though. And he apparently doesn't ...


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h.264 + aac in .mp4. Google up an x264 settings guide. (or use -preset slower). If you're doing something that the MPEG-LA would charge patent royalties for, screw them and use VP8 or VP9, with maybe a fallback to Theora if that helps compat. Old question, but check the quality at the start of the video if using x264. If it's not good, use 2-pass. I ...


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Use ffmpeg's concat filter to concatenate multiple -i dir/foo%d.png input sources into a single output video. Old question so not taking time to dig up links or write more. Just google.


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To expand on LordNeckbeard's answer, yes, just mux the JPEG data into an MJPEG video stream. That will be the smallest representation of the exact sequence of output images, even though MJPEG is a terribly inefficient codec by today's standards. (no temporal redundancy, and not even any intra prediction. You can make a variable-framerate MJPEG video to ...


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It takes a lot of bits to accurately, or nearly-accurately reproduce the input pixels, regardless of what they contain. The only exception is low-complexity stuff like a screen capture or animation, where big areas are EXACTLY the same colour, and/or at bit-for-bit identical from frame to frame. The difference between your intuition and real life comes ...


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A lossless codec that can read/write yuv 4:2:0 samples is logically like zip for the bytes of video data. You get literally identical (same md5 hash, byte-for-byte identical) output back after decompressing. That is the definition of lossless. See my answer to ...


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You can use the pad video filter to add the required space on the bottom, and then the overlay video filter to place the image: ffmpeg -i video.vob -i image.png -filter_complex \ "[0:v]pad=0:ih+20[bg];[bg][1:v]overlay=0:H-h,format=yuv420p[v]" \ -map "[v]" -map 0:a -c:v libx264 -c:a aac -strict -2 -movflags +faststart output.mp4 I had to make some ...


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I think it is easier to combine a full dimension background image (720x500px) with your video in ffmpeg instead of adding the 20px footer to the video. You can simply use the overlay filter for this: ffmpeg \ -loop 1 -i 720x500.jpg \ -i 720x480.mp4 \ -filter_complex overlay=0:0 \ -t 0:01.48 \ out.m4v Note: In this example you have to ...


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Probably no loss, but there is more to it than just YUV420. You can need to make sure the same ITU-R Recommendation is used (BT.601, BT.708 or maybe even 2020) In addition make sure the same color ranges is used (0-255 vs 16-235)


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Some people could be more in depth about this, but my understanding is that it depends on how the color is compressed. Going to 4:4:4 would certainly be lossless, but not necessarily worth it.


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This will output a lossless H.264 video where frames will use information from other frames ffmpeg -f image2 -r 30 -i %09d.jpg -vcodec libx264 -profile:v high444 -refs 16 -crf 0 -preset ultrafast a.mp4 Explanation of options: -f image2 - tells ffmpeg to select a group of images -r 30 - tells ffmpeg to encode at 30 frames (or images) per second (change ...



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