Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Because 4096 / 1920 = 2.13333 and 2160/1080 = 2. They are different aspect ratios, so yes, they end up letter boxing when you convert between them. That is the expected result. The 4K format you are using is a multiple of 2K and is not the same widescreen aspect ratio as 1080p. You can't translate between them without letterboxing, though there are ...


2

A standard for WAV is 48K / 16 bit mono, or stereo if there's ambiance or presence you'd like to preserve. The last two parameters are a consequence of those choices and you can calculate them based on your selection. Then any compression you might apply afterward will have a good starting basis. If all you're after is intelligibility, a lower sample rate ...


1

x264 would be a good option, its an extremely fast and efficient h264 encoder, probably the best on the market and its open source. I has several good presets/profiles f.e. the ultrafast profile which can encode FullHD with several 100FPS on a modern multi core cpu. I made good experiences with it regarding capturing real time rendering applications. Its ...


-1

You really only have one option. h.264. It is the only codec that can fulfill you needs here. And its the only codec that can play on mobile. You will have to pay licensing to MPEL LA, and probably to the software vendor (most likely core codec). You can also encode using some OS/Video card features (NVENC for example), and possibly save the software costs.


1

There is a rule in compression, quality, size and speed, pick two of three. Video compression is an incredibly complex process that requires a lot of resources on either the CPU, GPU or both. You can get around that one of two ways, you can either reduce the level of compression (with lossless being the fullest extreme) or you can reduce the quality ...


1

Just to add a bit to AJ Henderson correct answer. You do can compress in a lossless way with h264, this is the lossless predictive profile and is achieved by encoding with a CRF setting of 0. Though while you get lossless h264 compression that way you will endup with a larger file than your source file. Lossy compression cant be done twice without loosing ...


1

You have a misunderstanding of how compression works. In all but a few specialized types of lossy compression, when you compress something a second time, even in a much higher quality level than previous encodings, you still lose additional quality. Using a slower encoding from the same original source with constant quality will often produce a smaller ...



Top 50 recent answers are included