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3

You can use the pad video filter to add the required space on the bottom, and then the overlay video filter to place the image: ffmpeg -i video.vob -i image.png -filter_complex \ "[0:v]pad=0:ih+20[bg];[bg][1:v]overlay=0:H-h,format=yuv420p[v]" \ -map "[v]" -map 0:a -c:v libx264 -c:a aac -strict -2 -movflags +faststart output.mp4 I had to make some ...


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I think it is easier to combine a full dimension background image (720x500px) with your video in ffmpeg instead of adding the 20px footer to the video. You can simply use the overlay filter for this: ffmpeg \ -loop 1 -i 720x500.jpg \ -i 720x480.mp4 \ -filter_complex overlay=0:0 \ -t 0:01.48 \ out.m4v Note: In this example you have to ...


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To expand on LordNeckbeard's answer, yes, just mux the JPEG data into an MJPEG video stream. That will be the smallest representation of the exact sequence of output images, even though MJPEG is a terribly inefficient codec by today's standards. (no temporal redundancy, and not even any intra prediction. You can make a variable-framerate MJPEG video to ...


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This will output a lossless H.264 video where frames will use information from other frames ffmpeg -f image2 -r 30 -i %09d.jpg -vcodec libx264 -profile:v high444 -refs 16 -crf 0 -preset ultrafast a.mp4 Explanation of options: -f image2 - tells ffmpeg to select a group of images -r 30 - tells ffmpeg to encode at 30 frames (or images) per second (change ...


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No, such a thing does not exist. You can get some very rough guidelines in terms of things like suggested recording profiles for Youtube, Vimeo, or bitrates used by Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Instant Watch, but at the end of the day, the bitrate needed for a given resolution is entirely content dependent as well as dependent on how much time you can spend ...


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Probably no loss, but there is more to it than just YUV420. You can need to make sure the same ITU-R Recommendation is used (BT.601, BT.708 or maybe even 2020) In addition make sure the same color ranges is used (0-255 vs 16-235)


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It takes a lot of bits to accurately, or nearly-accurately reproduce the input pixels, regardless of what they contain. The only exception is low-complexity stuff like a screen capture or animation, where big areas are EXACTLY the same colour, and/or at bit-for-bit identical from frame to frame. The difference between your intuition and real life comes ...


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h.264 + aac in .mp4. Google up an x264 settings guide. (or use -preset slower). If you're doing something that the MPEG-LA would charge patent royalties for, screw them and use VP8 or VP9, with maybe a fallback to Theora if that helps compat. Old question, but check the quality at the start of the video if using x264. If it's not good, use 2-pass. I ...



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