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4

MP4 isn't an ideal format for intermediate saves. If you know you'll be re-opening the file, save it as losslessly as practicable, and use MP4 only for the final output. That said, depending on the encoder and settings you probably don't lose much if anything on subsequent saves. MP4 and similar codecs work by decimating the higher frequencies (details, ...


3

Short answer is No. Longer answer is, it depends. If you're encoding a file, then generally the output is the duration of the input, unless there's speed change or trim filters or -ss, -to, -t options applied. For a live input, FFmpeg will stop the encode when it encounters EOF on the input, so unless you know that, you won't know the output duration. For ...


2

You need to convert the codec used to encode the video to something that the players you are trying to use support. MPlayer supports a wider range of codecs than many players. To allow you to view the video in other players you need to transcode the video using an application like ffmpeg. The command below will provide the conversion you need: ffmpeg -i ...


1

Yes. Every time you "save" video in video-editor, you will re-render it with codec. Most codecs lose some video information for compression. So, every time you will lose some more information.


1

What are the limitations of AAC-HE codec while doing 5.1 audio ? HE-AAC v2 can only encode stereo from my experience with Nero AAC and the article in Wikipedia about Parametric Stereo. Why is AC3 preferred when compared to AAC-HE ? Which case are you actually talking about? Are you sure it's HE-AAC not AAC-LC? Dolby Digital / A/52 / ...


1

Yes. By definition, any time you save an audio or video file using a LOSSY compression scheme, you will lose something (by definition). Now, modern codecs have been getting better at minimizing perceptible losses. But it is always preferable to avoid ANY extra compression steps. Until the project is completely finished and ready for distribution, it is ...


1

If the codec is not lossless, such as Quicktime Animation Codec; true lossless, then yes. But if you are using a good encoder, I would gather even after 100 generations of degredation would you be able to even visually see the difference if you continually re-encoded the file outputs using MP4 at a high bitrate- say 30mbps for 1080p. Lower bitrates, ...



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