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5

What you are describing is effectively what 2-pass VBR does for you. It makes a first path that calculates the level of change for each particular time in the video and then uses this information to make the best possible use of the available storage space. It is, however, entirely possible to do the process manually by doing multiple encodings with ...


3

While there are video encoders that do this kind of thing, most commonly this is the work of a video switcher or mixer. A video switcher is a device used for mixing live video from multiple sources. The bad news is they generally aren't cheap. An HD capable switcher is typically in the $6000+ range with the absolute cheapest one I know of being the Black ...


3

It looks like a problem with the playback engine. I would try updating your video card drivers and/or making sure the playback engine (in the project/ project settings/general menu) is set to Mercury Playback Engine Software Only. If that doesn't work, I'd try uninstalling and re-installing Premiere. I don't know what can cause it on Mac OS, but on ...


3

I have a large set of jpgs that I want to convert to a video losslessly You can probably just mux the jpg images: ffmpeg -r 30 -i input%03d.jpg -codec copy output.mkv Then compare the md5sums of each frame with the framemd5 muxer: $ ffmpeg -i input%03d.jpg -f framemd5 - 0, 0, 0, 1, 460800, 29bcc2db3726c7dfec1826c5740f603f ...


3

I'm not sure how it will behave at very low frame rates, but it is worth pointing out this would also limit your options on how and when you could change frames since they would have to follow on the clock cycles. What is more likely to work in this case is a long keyframe interval. The majority of frames in a compression like H.264 only store the changes ...


2

If you are willing to use Adobe products, Premiere supports direct integration with Adobe Media Encoder and can be set with presets that include multiple output formats and sizes. Each encoding runs off the actual main project, thus you remove the extra generation of loss. Alternately, using a lossless quality intermediate file will prevent issues as no ...


2

Unfortunately you are not going to be able to accomplish your goal. Two major factors impact this. First, color processing on different systems is going to differ. This will result in slight differences in the colors that are displayed because many video players apply "enhancements" to video and what you actually see when viewing the video in a browser is ...


2

Complexity is the main thing. Because of how audio works, there tends to not be a whole lot of variation in the quality you get from a given bit rate. While video often has frames that are very similar from one image to another, audio rarely has the exact same sound playing for a long period of time. This lack of predictability in audio means that the ...


2

Your best bet for high quality and low size is 2 pass variable bit rate, but it is worth noting that the size of the video also has a ton to do with how much motion it contains and how often the scene changes. One of the most popular modern codecs to use for such compression is h.264. Video compression works by looking for similarities not only within one ...


2

10 times the length does sound pretty long, but isn't completely insane, particularly if you are running two pass. The more compression you are trying to do while maintaining quality, the longer it is going to take to compress it down. It's also possible that if you are using nested projects, it may still be trying to do some rendering at the native ...


2

The bands you're referring to could well just be a limitation of the 8-bit colour space. In theory the way to solve this is to use 10- or 12-bit colour space through every stage from rendering, to editing and mastering, through to output and even in the screen or projector. However your final output is probably going to be displayed in an 8 bits per ...


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If compatibility is your top priority, then you should include two alternative versions of your video on your website, like in this HTML example. As for the exact formats I would suggest: H.264 and AAC in MP4: Chrome, Firefox 22+ on Windows, IE9, Safari 3.1 VP8 and Vorbis in WebM: Firefox fallback for Mac and older versions on Windows. (If you need ...


1

The output is an .MTS file, which is ~450 MB. What is the reason for that? It is desirable to record and master in the highest quality possible, and only convert to lower bitrates for delivery (if necessary) at the final stage. 450MB for two minutes is 30mbps. That's not particularly high for a capture bitrate; it's a typical capture bitrate for ...


1

HD video is very, very large at high quality. 450MB for two minutes isn't actually that bad. To put it in perspective, assuming you were shooting 1080P and 24fps, if there was no compression applied, that same 2 minutes of video would be 6 gigabytes of information. The reason that videos you download or watch on bluray disks are so much smaller is that ...


1

There's a table here showing support for the various video codecs by the four main browsers around today. For Chrome and Safari the only option that plays on both is h.264 in an mp4 container. I've found that main profile h264 video plays best across most modern devices, but you can wind it back to base profile if you're having problems. This is a good ...


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There are many hardware options including Intel media SDK, FPGA options, nvidi, ASIC solutions, elgato, etc. But for my money, I prefer quality. The software solutions, especially x264, perform WAY (WAY) better as measured by visual quality by file size ratio. As for Quality per watt in terms of encoding, you cant beat a good ASIC.


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I'm with AJ. Unless you know the characteristics of every player that might view this, it would be unwise to rely on a small sample of test results. Using a standard frame rate like 24 fps with a keyframe interval of 24 frames will give you essentially the same thing with no compromise in compatibility. The intermediate frames will be minimally small because ...


1

The encoding time is pretty long (but not unheard of), but I think your problem is your output format. You're likely not using a compressed format which is why the result is 27 GB - a movie at 1080p of the same length usually doesn't top 5 GB. It would be helpful if you elaborated a bit on the settings you used to export the media.


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You can create an avi animation as a series of png images ( png is lossless so the jpeg => png conversion should not degrade your pictures ): if your images a named img_0001.jpg ffmpeg -r 25 -start_number 1 -f image2 -i "img_%04d.jpg" -vcodec png video.avi where "25" is the frame rate you want in the resulting video. -start_number is not needed if it ...


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If you want something pretty standard and with good quality with DV. The most important thin, whatever the codec you choose, configure it for an interlaced source (since VHS signal is interlaced). If you don't you will end up with a digitized file that will need more space and have much lower quality.


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VHS is already highly 'compressed', so capturing to an uncompressed format is likely overkill. For your purposes MJPEG with a reasonably high quality setting will preserve all your options and shouldn't degrade the images any further than VHS already has. MJPEG goes by other names -- the idea is that it's all "I-frames". It is a lossy codec, but there are ...


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What you wish to do is somewhat convoluted. There is a path to achieving it in the 2 step process you propose, but I would just suggest creating a new folder where you copy all the input files and rename to form a continuous sequence. Let's say you have 3 folders and the following files in them to be joined in that order Folder A: a001.png, a002.png, ...


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You can change the format, once you add a watch folder to your watch folders window, click the F4V under the format tab, and you can configure how you want each video from that watch folder to be set as... Furthermore if you click the output folder destination, you can change the filename and destination in which the movie will be saved to. Hope this helps ...


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Memory size This is certainly not true for any encoding as reducing 10 bits to 8 bits is by definition reducing the size. However, it is possible that some codecs adds a segment for alpha channel turning 24-bits (3 bytes (RGB) per pixel) into 32-bits (3 bytes for color RGB + 1 byte for alpha channel). This way it may appear as if the video takes more ...



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