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1

You can recreate this effect with the CC Radial Blur effect set to "Fading Zoom" together with the Ripple effect or the Turbulent Displacement effect. Apply these effects to an Adjustment layer above your video layer and add a round mask in the middle with some feather to have the blur and distortion only on the sides of the screen. Use separate Adjustment ...


5

This is called stroboscopic effect. It refers to when the sample rate is synchronized or very slightly out of sync resulting in a much slower representation of the motion that results from taking a picture that is at the same point or slightly advanced point in a subsequent cycle of a higher frequency cyclic motion. You can actually do the same exact thing ...


1

I'm unsure if there is a specific "official" word for this effect. I guess I would call it frequency synchronisation. This effect appears whenever the framerate (e.g. frequency your camera takes a picture) of you camera matches the frequency of another recurring action. It doesn't have to be the exact same frequency but a multiple of it. So if the rotor of ...


1

In addition to the AfterEffects plug-in API, there's also FxPlug, OpenFX, and AVX plug-ins. FxPlugs often work in real-time because they tend to utilize the GPU. They work in FCPX and Motion. OpenFX plug-ins can work in a variety of hosts (sometimes requiring an adaptor), but as far as I know, they aren't real-time usually. They work in Sony Vegas and I ...


2

You can achieve an effect like this with a couple of distortion filters from most video editing or motion graphics packages. For example in FCPX/Motion, you could apply a couple of Bulge distortion filters to the upper right and lower left and adjust the scale and radius as appropriate. In terms of implementing it yourself, I agree that it's a question for ...


3

If you don't mind using a computer. There is a great solution (for me at least) which is called Blender, if you don't know about it, it is a free sortware that lets you do 3D and mix 3D with video, but it also lets you do video editing and a lot more staff. Google for Blender. With that you don't need to be very precise to record your ghosts, just record ...


5

There are so many interesting ways to do this. One of the easiest ways (in-camera, no post production work) is to use a piece of glass. Film Riot did a tutorial on it, they explain it best, see below: ...


3

"If I set it to 1/25 (shutter speed) does that mean absolute maximum (or lowest setting)?" Yes, if it was a non-digital video camera. This rule applied to the old non-digital (film) video cameras where you cannot set shutter speed lower than the frame rate. Meaning that one celluloid was exposed for the full 1/25th of a second. Assuming 25fps. For digital ...


2

A few good options to consider: If you disobey the 180 degree shutter rule, and shoot at a lower shutter speed, you'll get more motion blur in your shot. Whether or not this is what you're going for is up for debate (it'll produce a dream sequence - ghostly like effect), but it's worth trying out. Note that EVERYTHING in your shot with have increased ...


4

If you ditch your plan to use moving shots you can do a simple background subtraction which will look a lot cleaner than greenscreen given this is a low cost production. This works by having a shot of your scene without any actor in it e.g. only the background and then film your scene with the actors without moving the camera, afterwards you can use a ...


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For fixed camera shots, if you plan the shot so that they don't pass over any other actors, you can simply shoot them on one plate and shoot the rest of the actors on another plate. You then mask the one plate over the other so that they appear semi-transparent and possibly use a blurred difference mask for adding an edge glow. Greenscreening overall is ...


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I don't know this model, but in general video cameras don't use a physical shutter, but an electronic one. The aperture is always open and 'shuttering' means limiting the exposure time through blanking. So a setting less that the frame rate is effectively 'off'. As for 'spilling the same info onto several frames', that's only true if there's no motion in ...



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