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5

It's not an illusion - it's called chroma subsampling. Most video codecs do not represent colour in full resolution as a way of achieving greater compression by taking advantage of the way that the human eye is more sensitive to brightness ("luma") than colour ("chroma"). Many codecs don't bother giving you too much colour information when you're not going ...


4

It's a well known issue that red component in video devices suffers in presentation. The reason is the red color's long wave length and that our eyes respond more to long wave ranges (not to be confused with color sensitivity which would be in yellow-green range). For us to perceive the colors as equal (ref. responsiveness) the green and blue are ...


3

While pure red is tough to match, partly due to our visual sensitivity in that region, I've never noticed any tendency for red to 'pixelate' more than any other color. Maybe you're seeing an artifact of compression? Do you also see this in non-electronic displays like backlit signs, etc? Another answer here claims that manufacturers kept secrets about color ...


3

A long VGA cable with a proper amp/spliter on the TX side, would be the simplest option. You can get good VGA cables up to 150' at modest prices from http://www.pccables.com . Another good option is a CAT5 extender kit. http://milestek.com/p-16209-vga-over-cat5ecat6-decora-wall-plate-set.aspx Without a more detailed description of what you are trying to ...


2

This type of photography is called 'available light' which covers shooting subjects without adding strobes or other lights. It is favored by many photographers for many reasons. I personally favor this because the subject and scene appear more natural to me. Things that glow interest me as well and there are tons of things that fit this: the moon, neon art, ...


1

If you want something pretty standard and with good quality with DV. The most important thin, whatever the codec you choose, configure it for an interlaced source (since VHS signal is interlaced). If you don't you will end up with a digitized file that will need more space and have much lower quality.


1

VHS is already highly 'compressed', so capturing to an uncompressed format is likely overkill. For your purposes MJPEG with a reasonably high quality setting will preserve all your options and shouldn't degrade the images any further than VHS already has. MJPEG goes by other names -- the idea is that it's all "I-frames". It is a lossy codec, but there are ...


1

I think the issue you see here is actually because of bright pixels against a very dark background. Most lossy compression takes into account that we are far more perceptive to lightness differences than we are color differences. Depending on the codec used, and encoding options chosen, the blocks used for approximating the video can be fixed size, which ...


1

to answer your question: basic setup: camera, scene, computer with editing suite (after effects, premiere, vegas, final cut express, quicktime) You must trigger record frame every second or predifined interval of time, setup your editing timeline at 25 fps and import your footage. if you are doing frames you must import frames interpet them and put it on ...



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