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8

This "effect" is called Rolling Shutter. It is common in most CMOS camera sensors because they don't capture an instantaneous image, instead they do it progressively over a period of time. CCD sensors do not have this problem as they do have instantaneous capture.


4

The short answer is "No." DVD by definition is limited to 720x480 video with a fairly low bitrate, compressed specifically with MPEG-2. There is absolutely no way to make your HD video look just as good with those constraints. Some DVD players do let you play .mp4, .mkv, or whatever files that happen to be stored on a DVD, but that isn't a standard ...


4

It is down to the raster/line speed of the CMOS array in your camera - it does not expose the whole thing at once, it scans from left to right and downwards. For even more amusement google for iPhone propellor videos, such as this one, or in fact any video of oscillating or moving objects. The solution is to get equipment with slightly more upmarket sensor ...


3

Most modern codecs will support whatever frame rate you throw at them. The choice is more of an artistic decision than a technical one. For the best quality, you should match the frame rate of your source or some even multiple there of. If you can choose on your source, then choose according to the feel you want. 24(23.976) is more "cinematic" and is ...


3

If your source footage is interlaced, deinterlace it. If your progressive frame rate is a constant 23.976, 24, 25, 29.97, or 30 fps, then keep the frame rate as it is, unless you require a very low bitrate and want to halve the frame rate. These are all widely supported frame rates, although other arbitrary frame rates below 30 fps will often work as well. ...


3

You will need a USB Video Capture Device to connect the game to your laptop. In order to also be able to view the game on the TV, you will need 2 splitters for the video and audio and an extra composite cable. You would run the yellow and white game console outputs to the splitters and attach the splitters directly to the Video Capture device. The red ...


2

I couldn't find specific details, but it appears that ancillary data on SDI in general conforms to SMPTE 291M. I couldn't find any details about the specific implementations used for deck control. It appears like there could potentially be some variation between manufacturers or even particular decks since the ancillary space doesn't seem to be that ...


2

I have a Zoom H2 and I'm very impressed with the sound quality. It has 4 built-in mics giving it a 360° recording capability. Battery life is poor though so a couple of sets of high-capacity rechargeables is in order.


2

Personally, I would use a Video Capture Card that supports SECAM (such as the Hauppauge model 01087: WinTV-PVR-150 low profile with PAL/SECAM tuner) and simply record it on my PC/Mac/Linux box. [I've actually done this from NTSC VHS tapes to MPEG-2 using a PVR-150 capture card on a Ubuntu Linux box.]


2

The ADVC-300 can take SECAM input: http://www.grassvalley.com/products/advc300 This will convert to DV format, which is quite sufficient for VHS quality.


2

An XLR cable used with an adapter won't give you the audio quality that an all-XLR cable will. If audio quality is really important, I'd buy or borrow an external recorder that takes XLR cables directly. If this isn't an option, pick up an XLR to 1/8" adapter cable. I suggest taping the adapter to the camcorder so it doesn't move around much. (Mic cables ...


2

Answer 3: Use XLR cables to get the audio from the PA to your camcorder. To convert the balanced PA signal to the line signal, take a passive DI-box (aka DI-unit). They are not expensive. You'll get a solid one for less than 50$ by Amazon. More info: DI-Units - Wikipedia DI-Boxes - Amazon.com


2

Your best bet to easily do this is probably to set up two cameras with half the field of view being used. Then simply setup a simple project that can combine the two and encode it for electronic distribution. If you want to do an all digital route, you are still going to need to run an encoding after the fact to get the size down, so doing the combination ...


2

The processor in your camera is not the only thing you need to override for your proposal to work. Consider the focus system, the iris, and the shutter system, and their respective upper and lower performance boundaries. What you are suggesting appears to be a design up idea not an after it was built idea. In other words you need a whole team of engineers at ...


2

The answer is always "More light". The higher the illumination of the sensor (within obvious limits), the less noise or grain. If you must deal only with ambient light -- you can't supplement or fill in -- then open the iris. However, in doing so you trade off depth of field, so it's a balancing act. Generally, avoid increasing preamp 'gain' to compensate ...


2

There are a couple ways you could go about this. If you can do it in a single take, then you can record the audio and video at the same time and then simply sync them up and all will be well in the world. If you want to be able to do multiple takes, then what you should do is do it the way they make music videos. Do the audio first, make your recording ...


2

You must use the proper formatting for it to be read by a DVD player that only reads standards compliant disks. Specifically, DVD Video disks use the UDF 1.02 format.


2

AJ Henderson and Craig have excellent answers. I'd just like to add my own knowledge about making miniatures look full-size. As far as I can tell, there are 4 factors that make a miniature look, well, miniature. 1) Lighting. If the train is supposed to look like it's outside, shoot it outside or next to a window that sun is coming through. Sunlight looks ...


2

Short answer: no. Long answer, maybe. You have very limited scripting ability via the auto update function of the camera. You simply drop a text file called "autoexec.sh" on the SD card before turning the camera on and the camera will execute the script. Though I haven't seen a script that would do something like infinite recording by erasing the oldest part ...


2

You are over thinking it. Edit a quick beep in before the audio starts on the song, play the song aloud while you are recording the drums. Hit one of your drums so that you can see and hear it quickly on the video as well. Record the audio direct from your drums and have a third track that is the microphone for the camera. The camera audio track will ...


1

The first thing is to make sure any gain is off. Gain on a video camera is like high ISO on a digital still camera. It increases the noise floor significantly and causes much more noise in even a good image. This should make the camera make other adjustments to try to preserve the exposure with a lower noise floor. If there is still too much noise, it ...


1

Look in your video editing software for "Rolling Shutter" correction. That will help, but probably not completely eliminate, the problem.


1

You should check your recorded video with MediaInfo. Regarding your problem, it shows, if the durations of the video and the audio is the same or not, if the interleave of the audio (the starting offset) is set correctly in which sampling rate your audio was recorded. Then, I would import your video file into Audacity (which imports only the audio, of ...


1

I can't really say anything else beyond what Neil said...that's great info...but I'll throw this into the mix. If you're handy with electronics (or know someone who is), try making this adapter from off-the-shelf parts at Radio Shack.


1

The worst part of transferring old VHS to DVD is that it has to be done in real time as VHS is linear access and analog. Here are two ways I know of that work. One will eat your time the other will eat your wallet. 1) for about $35 or less you can get a transfer device which connects the output of your VHS machine into a USB interface to your computer. ...


1

The "Photo Booth" application on OS X can record video, and is pretty simple to use You could probably lock it down with the parental settings An iPad 2 has the same thing, although it might be more easily misplacable


1

to answer your question: basic setup: camera, scene, computer with editing suite (after effects, premiere, vegas, final cut express, quicktime) You must trigger record frame every second or predifined interval of time, setup your editing timeline at 25 fps and import your footage. if you are doing frames you must import frames interpet them and put it on ...


1

The specific feature set will determine if it is appropriate for you application, though from my experience most of the high end field recorders are very good quality. The Zoom series have a great (well deserved) reputation for being relatively easy to use, and being kind to your wallet. If you wish to supply your own mic, you may wish to find one without ...


1

I have a Marantz PMD620 & it works very nicely -- the builtin microphone sounds very clear, battery life is good, it has timestamping, and it takes SD cards. I'm not a professional or audio expert, but I'm very happy with it.


1

Mythtv could be of use to you. It will automatically mark commercial in points and out points in a recording. You could modify the their transcode shell script to cut the program and leave the commercials.



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