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9

The short answer? No. The long answer: No, copyright law requires you to have an appropriate licence from the copyright holders (usually the record label - not the artist - if they're in a record deal!) There are three distinct rights for every piece of music: Phonogram copyright (the sound recording) (symbol: ℗, "P" in a circle) Composition, score, ...


5

Very broadly speaking, you have a much easier experience obtaining permission if you are not making money from someone else's content. Most copyright laws recognise 'fair use' -- a small quote or a clip that is proof of someone else having said something. It is customary and advisable to put such clip in a box or window to show that the content is being ...


4

You can use a file storage service like: DropBox Google Drive Microsoft SkyDrive Apple iCloud You can restrict access of your files there to a handful of persons. For example on Google Drive, when you share a file with some people, it asks you for their email addresses. It then sends an email to all those people with a "secret" link. In theory, this ...


3

Disclaimer: not a lawyer, but based on the experience from usage (and making) of such tracks - All music is "copyrighted" by default unless the creator explicitly has in writing abandon those rights. The author can also write it's OK to use his music for "anything". Copyright only means that the author has the right to determine the usage of his track. If ...


3

This is really going to come down to what the terms of the EULA is. It should outline what rights you have to use the Apple provided contents. Most likely you would be fine as included assets are typically intended for reproduction. It might be trickier if you were going to sell copies, but a commercial is probably ok. As far as using it as commercial ...


2

Unless you/they have a contract which states that it was a" work for hire" and they have ownership of the raw media, the videographer or photographer owns the rights to the raw footage. The client has paid for the finished product, but that is all, and it is questionable if they even have the right to take excerpts from or re-edit it without your permission, ...


2

I am not a lawyer, but I played one on TV. If the contract wasn't specific than you might have some wiggle room. Typically contract law (varies by state) says that if the contract is unclear then it favors the person who didn't write it. So if they provided you an unclear contract it favors you when it isn't clear. Unfortunately if they hired you to create ...


2

Typically, there shouldn't be a legal problem using any transitions\effects\clip art that come with any software package. That is what they are there for. Ultimately, you will need to read the license agreement and possibly contact Apple to find out what your actual rights are.


2

You'd be best off doing a search for CC-licensed music first. You may find something that works for you that already allows commercial use; even if you find a particular track that's "no commercial use" that would work, you can always write and ask permission - which you're much more likely to get directly from the artist.


2

Anything published anywhere is automatically copyrighted, with all rights reserved to the author or publisher. The source of this video is known, so your obvious choice here is to contact the publisher and ask permission. This is a promotional video, so it's very possible that they will permit your use, with proper attribution or for a small fee. But you ...


2

For this, you'll really need to see a lawyer to determine if the original re-mix has sufficient rights to the song to place their remix under Creative Commons in the first place. If they do, then it depends what Creative Commons license they used. As long as it allows commercial usage (not a NC license) then you would be ok as long as you followed the ...


2

Yes, that's the core condition of the CC-ShareAlike license. Any derivative or work that contains the image has to be distributed under the same license for the entire video. Even if you create a long video with only one image that is licensed under CC-SA, you will have to use the same license. Using a different license would be a violation to the terms of ...


1

Actors certainly have no rights to the footage itself, without other agreement, that would belong to the cameraman shooting the footage, however, just because they don't have claim to the footage doesn't mean they don't have claim to the contents of the footage. The writers most likely have copyright for the script content they produced, the director has ...


1

From the by-sa legal terminology: Section 1 – Definitions. Adapted Material means material subject to Copyright and Similar Rights that is derived from or based upon the Licensed Material and in which the Licensed Material is translated, altered, arranged, transformed, or otherwise modified in a manner requiring permission under the Copyright and ...


1

Often short clips for demonstration purposes qualify as fair use, however you can't generally use more than a few seconds. Even video clips that have been released on the Internet are not necessarily safe to use as the content may still require you to have a license. Your best bet is to contact a lawyer since fair use varies greatly from jurisdiction to ...


1

Vimeo seems to be more supportive of Fair Use. My video is private. It's a non-commercial home movie.


1

On youtube, I would just contest the copyright holders. For it to be fair use you need to be able to ask these 4 questions (not all 4 need to be good to be fair use): 1. What are you doing with the copyrighted content? If you are doing something highly transformative with the content then you will have more room under the fair use doctrine. You are more ...


1

This is really the same question as any private distribution and is dependent on the hosting provider's TOS. Personally, I use my own web server to host the files for download by friends and put a password on the download (or simply hide the link). A simple web hosting package with enough space would allow for this. They could even watch it as they ...


1

You could host the videos yourself. I use a piece of software called Plex. Basically, you set up a media server at home, which you can then share with people by sending them an invite. In effect, you're giving people passworded access to your media server. You can even choose which videos are shared with which people by creating categories, and then ...


1

I am not a lawyer, but as far as I know, the commercial vs non-commercial distinction doesn't matter in terms of copyright restrictions unless the music is released under a license that allows non-commercial use. Fair use generally only applies to using a (small) portion of the song. For example, if you had a character that is supposed to hear the song on ...


1

You can download royalty-free songs for video production or poems free for video production. It is no charge


1

Just to clarify, the "Standard YouTube license" found in YouTube's ToS basically grants YouTube the permission to serve the video to anyone who asks to see it on YouTube.com or through an approved portal like an embedded player or mobile app (you may restrict the work's playback in certain markets, or prevent certain non-core uses, such as embedding, ...


1

It appears this question is not relevant for this group as it is about a legal matter, I am not qualified nor would anyone here be expected to be able to give you legal advice. I recommend that you seek legal counsel from an attorney that practices copyright, trade mark or intellectual property law in Canada. You might start by looking for firms that ...


1

Advice on IP issues is worth what you pay for it. Here, it's free and worth every cent. (-: In general, you can't use copyrighted material without the permission of the holder. Since this is for a business, you'll likely have to pay something, maybe not a lot, for the use. Only the rights holder can say for sure, but to be legal you must ask, and probably ...



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