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The only way to do it with literally zero mathematical quality loss is to make a gigantic output file with a lossless codec. (e.g. utvideo, FFV1, or x264 in lossless mode (--qp 0). A better solutions that would achieve the same thing is: mux the subtitle file into the mkv, with mkvmerge. You set a flag so it either plays by default or doesn't. Then you'd ...


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The default settings for ffmpeg are very low quality, and since you don't specify any codec or quality parameters it's just using the defaults (I don't know why the devs don't fix that because it generates a lot of questions on forums everywhere). Try adding -c:v libx264 -crf 20 -preset slow to the command. -c:v libx264 tells it to use the libx264 ...


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You can use ffprobe (which comes with ffmpeg) to give you info about your movie files from the command line. You may require some shell-fu to convert the output of ffprobe into something you can use though. I've done this in the past; basically I pipe the output of ffprobe to sed or awk to grab the bits of info I need, then use this to drive the parameters ...


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As far as deinterlacing: With a good deinterlacer (QTGMC, or at least ffmpeg's yadif=3,mcdeint=2), you can get smooth video at 60000/1001 (NTSC) fps. If your source has quick motions that you'd like to look smooth, even in slo-mo, then deinterlace 640x480i60 -> 640x480p60. If you really need small files, you can drop every other frame of the deinterlaced ...


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Something you could try is to copy the VOB files from the DVD and concatenate them all into one MPEG file, then you can see if the original file is corrupted. Here's how: open your DVD in Finder, and navigate to the VIDEO_TS folder. Inside will be all the DVD files .BUP, IFS and VOB. The VOB files are the video objects, they're what you want. Now find ...



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