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3

That's way more than h.264 can handle. The maximum resolution for h.264 is 4096×2304 with Level 5.1 or 5.2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H.264#Levels There are lossless codecs who can theoretically handle this video resolution but it would make no sense to do this. There is no hardware capable of playing videos in this resolution at any acceptable frame ...


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The 'interface connector' is (almost certainly) a serial control port, not a video output. LVD stored composite analog video, so there are no chroma or difference signals available to assist in digitizing the video.


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Apparently by default ffmpeg only copies one stream of each type. To tell it to copy all streams, you need -map 0 So, this does it: ffmpeg -i "concat:a01.mxf|b02.mxf" -y -map 0 -c copy result.mxf


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Please note this is UK legislation After some research I found the following in a Government consultation paper: From MODERNISING COPYRIGHT: A modern, robust and flexible framework http://www.ipo.gov.uk/response-2011-copyright-final.pdf There is a clear mismatch between what is permitted by law and the type of private copying that most people think is ...


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There are a few problems here that need to be addressed. First, the pitch shot is vertically oriented or "portrait" (vs landscape). This is considered very, very bad practice. This is a huge and constant amateur mistake because many amateurs now shoot video with their tablets and smartphones and hold the device the way they normally do, vertically, but ...


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Taking a closer look at the footage now that I'm at home, it's mostly the level of activity and motion in the shots. Even in the Sony video, the quality absolutely falls apart any time that there is high motion and unstable video. The way video compression works, it depends on predictable and smooth motion to achieve good compression results, especially ...


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Given your are using a VPS this is no suprise (guessing you only have a single core with 1-3GHz) and you won't be able to crunch the conversion down to a few minutes. You can try using -c:v libx264 -presets ultrafast but I'd guess it will still take you about 45-60 minutes to encode. Also remove the -crf option when using a preset (they choose a default ...


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Somewhat of an duplicate of: Can I manually change an .mp4 to .m4v by changing the extension in the Finder (mac) or explorer (win)? MP4 and M4V are essentially the exact same thing, M4V is usually used to indicate video only files but some sofware/companies are using it for standard MP4 files with video AND audio (lots of Apple software f.e.). It's just a ...


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If you copied your command there then your issue is probably -acodec:0 mp. That should be -acodec:0 mp3. You can just use -c:a mp3 to apply the encoding options to all audio tracks at once, no need to apply them for each individually. Other than that your mapping is correct and shouldn't be the issue. Edit: To conclude the discussion in the comments ...


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You are best off to convert from a supported format (DVI, HDMI, maybe even DisplayPort) to SDI. SDI cards are not designed for gaming, they are designed for workstations and video. You aren't going to get a good quality gaming graphics card with SDI outputs.


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Generally, I would expect that just about any solution will work pretty well now. The capabilities of even cheap modern hardware so far outpace the capability of laserdisc that you aren't likely to lose much. Certainly a professional quality capture system similar to the ones Matrox sells would do a superb job, but I'd hazard that even a cheap $30 USB to ...


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An MP4 file normally contains H.264 video and AAC audio, both of which are compatible with the FLV container. You could simply copy over the streams: ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -c copy output.flv Since you're copying the streams, this will be as close to instantaneous as you're going to get and will not result in any loss of quality.


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There isn't a perfect answer to this problem. AVI and MP4 are just container's for video streams, so without knowing more about the actual streams in the containers, it is impossible to tell how much quality loss there would be, but as a general rule of thumb, it isn't all that atypical for AVI to use far less efficient video compression algorithms than MP4 ...


1

You are using the same bitrate for each video. The bitrate determines how much data is used per second. The resolution has nothing to do with how much data is used, it only impacts the number of points of data which are encoded (and thus determines part of the quality of the video output for a given bitrate). What you end up with is a lower resolution ...


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MP4 files should be all you need. There shouldn't be any encryption on the files. It is possible you may need to download a codec. MP4 files are just a container format, so different codecs could be used within it. It is possible that you don't have the needed codec installed, but if you do, the files should just open in After Effects without issue.


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RAM is not the critical part of a transcode, CPU is. Since it is working stream to stream, fairly minimal memory actually has to be required if the encoder is operating efficiently. The memory speed does matter for scratch space for the processor, but not so much the quantity. The CPU (or GPU if using GPU optimized encoding) is what does all the work and ...


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Whenever you publish something to end-users you ALWAYS want square pixels, everything else WILL make problems. So just convert your anamorphic video to a square pixel aspect ratio. Handbrake should automatically handle that, the settings you have right now should output a video with square pixel aspect ratio. Just add the vertical resolution. Is there any ...


1

The output is an .MTS file, which is ~450 MB. What is the reason for that? It is desirable to record and master in the highest quality possible, and only convert to lower bitrates for delivery (if necessary) at the final stage. 450MB for two minutes is 30mbps. That's not particularly high for a capture bitrate; it's a typical capture bitrate for ...


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HD video is very, very large at high quality. 450MB for two minutes isn't actually that bad. To put it in perspective, assuming you were shooting 1080P and 24fps, if there was no compression applied, that same 2 minutes of video would be 6 gigabytes of information. The reason that videos you download or watch on bluray disks are so much smaller is that ...


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For VHS, the signal will be kept highest quality if you connect via s-video, so yes, you should use an s-video cable if your VCR has an s-video output. Depending on how good your VCR is, you may get a significant improvement from a better deck. Quality of the read heads on various VCRs can vary a fair bit and while the majority of the difference was in ...


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Most current graphics cards will have HDMI output and a HDMI to SDI convertor might be cheaper solution than a DVI to SDI.


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There are different laws regarding ripping DVDs depending on where you live. Two points to consider though: Cases have been made (in the US) that you are within your rights as a license holder to make an archival copy for backup. Having said that, breaking DRM is almost always instantly illegal. Little bit of a catch-22 there for sure. Having said all ...


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This is a "very" old question, but there is a pretty simple method to do this (and something that comes up surprisingly often). So if you landed here, I do hope you find this solution helpful. Change the individual slides to pdf. Turn the pdf to jpg Turn the jpg's into a film. To do this I have used unoconv, ghostscript, graphicsmagick and ffmpeg. ...


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It works for me, but everything has a green tint and the higher the brightness the less any color but green is visible. Using a sony trinitron.



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