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Many different factors can contribute to stutter in video playback. It could be a CPU issue (check your CPU when playing the video) in which case, a simpler codec or a player that can leverage the graphics card for decoding would help. It could also be data rate related though. In this case, using a simpler format would actually compound the problem as ...


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Amazingly, the best place to start with a question like this is Youtube. Believe it or not they have help file that explain the process with quite a bit of detail: https://support.google.com/youtube/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=1722171&topic=2888648&ctx=topic On Youtube itself many others have offered up video tutorials on how to do it: ...


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Please note this is UK legislation After some research I found the following in a Government consultation paper: From MODERNISING COPYRIGHT: A modern, robust and flexible framework http://www.ipo.gov.uk/response-2011-copyright-final.pdf There is a clear mismatch between what is permitted by law and the type of private copying that most people think is ...


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The output is an .MTS file, which is ~450 MB. What is the reason for that? It is desirable to record and master in the highest quality possible, and only convert to lower bitrates for delivery (if necessary) at the final stage. 450MB for two minutes is 30mbps. That's not particularly high for a capture bitrate; it's a typical capture bitrate for ...


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HD video is very, very large at high quality. 450MB for two minutes isn't actually that bad. To put it in perspective, assuming you were shooting 1080P and 24fps, if there was no compression applied, that same 2 minutes of video would be 6 gigabytes of information. The reason that videos you download or watch on bluray disks are so much smaller is that ...


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For VHS, the signal will be kept highest quality if you connect via s-video, so yes, you should use an s-video cable if your VCR has an s-video output. Depending on how good your VCR is, you may get a significant improvement from a better deck. Quality of the read heads on various VCRs can vary a fair bit and while the majority of the difference was in ...


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There are different laws regarding ripping DVDs depending on where you live. Two points to consider though: Cases have been made (in the US) that you are within your rights as a license holder to make an archival copy for backup. Having said that, breaking DRM is almost always instantly illegal. Little bit of a catch-22 there for sure. Having said all ...


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Have you tried using Quicktime Pro version 7? It's what I usually use for file conversions. It costs about £20 / $30. http://store.apple.com/uk/product/D3380Z/A/quicktime-7-pro-for-mac-os-x Open your file. Go to the file menu, and select Export Choose your format, e.g. Quicktime Movie with ProRes 422 codec at 30 fps.


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You can achieve all your goals using ffmpeg and sox, these are command line tools for video and audio processing respectively. I can not provide you with a ready to roll solution, but here are examples for a pre-roll video, audio noise reduction, text overlay and conversion from AVCHD.


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VGA is RGBUV (horizontal and vertical sync) not YPbPr so without active adapting hardware, it isn't going to work. The formats are not compatible as the addressing information is missing. You might be able to find a dual mode monitor that has support for both formats on the connector (some video mixers do for example), but it would be luck of the draw ...


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While it can't go direct to H.264, VirtualDub I believe can work with Vfw codecs and can transcode to something more compatible with your other tools. I don't know if Quicktime for Windows supports Vfw codecs or not, but I do believe the Pro version of Quicktime supports H.264 encoding. If you have Adobe Media Encoder, it would also easily do what you ...


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What you are looking for is called a Screen Capture program or Screen Cast program. A quick Google search turned up gtk-recordMyDesktop as an option that should work for your purposes and appears to be built in to Ubuntu. This was the site I found that explained more detail on how it is used. I personally have no experience working with Ubuntu, let alone ...



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