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4

Hope this explanation is what you're looking for: When you transcode to an encoding such as H.264 (MPEG-4 part 10) you necessarily also resample the video, that's part of H.264 compression technique. Nontheless, I doubt if this is the reason you experience a timing gap since the resampling doesn't necessarily influence the clock rate of the media. So, I ...


4

Although @stib's advice is sound, I disagree with "to get an appreciable size reduction you would have to throw away a lot of quality". Cameras have to compress on-the-fly, so they use constrained baseline mode, which is to say, they skip most of the tricks that H.264 codec uses to efficiently compress videos. If space isn't a pressing concern, keep them ...


4

As you are hardcoding subtitles, the video (with the subtitles added) will be re-encoded. You can use the CRF rate control method to modulate the quality of the output. So, start with ffmpeg -i grdedFinal.mov -vf subtitles=portSbs.srt -crf 18 -c:a copy gradedFinalwithSubs.mov If the quality's not acceptable, lower that value till it is - in exchange ...


3

You can use ffmpeg, a command-line tool to do this. If you want equal-sized splits, use ffmpeg -i input -segment_time 30 -f segment -force_key_frames expr:gte(t,n_forced*30) -reset_timestamps 1 a%02d.mp4 If you need to split at irregular intervals, use ffmpeg -i input -crf 18 -segment_times 30,60,90 -f segment -force_key_frames 30,60,90 ...


3

Use this ffmpeg* command: ffmpeg -i "20151105-175532.dad" -c:v copy "20151105-175532.mp4" *get 32-bit static build.


3

Yes, it seems to be a problem of generated timecode. See https://trac.videolan.org/vlc/ticket/12713#no1 Switch to ffmpeg (with a GUI like Avanti) to avoid this issue. My answer to an earlier webm question may guide you on settings.


3

Just integrate all filtering into one command: ffmpeg -i input.mp4 \ -filter_complex "[0:v]crop=in_w/2:in_h:0:0 [top]; \ [0:v]crop=in_w/2:in_h:in_w/2:0[bottom]; \ [top][bottom]vstack[outv]" \ -map "[outv]" -map 0:a -c:a copy output_3dv.mp4 Edit: this command below scales and pads the output to 2000x2000 ffmpeg -i input.mp4 \ -filter_complex ...


3

Judge based on the quality rather than the bitrate value. Use CRF mode encoding and if the quality isn't what you can accept, decrease the CRF value. ffmpeg -i "%%a" -s 3840x2610 -c:v libx264 -crf 18 -acodec copy D:\%%~na.mp4


3

Use Avanti with ffmpeg. The former has a job control manager where you drop in multiple files at once and go. You can find webm encoding guide for ffmpeg here: http://trac.ffmpeg.org/wiki/Encode/VP8 Use crf mode encoding and experiment till you get desired size. Set b:v high like 10M and tweak CRF value and if you have no audio, use -an in place of -c:a ...


3

A lot of these answers seem somewhat misleading unfortunately. Forget about getting a capture card. Practically every one has AGC. AGC is very similar to macrovision, except it's superimposed onto any video source. It's impossible to disable unless you use Linux and know your way around hacking drivers. Some cards on Windows have third party tools to ...


2

I can't give you specific commands but since these are fairly short I'd extract the individual frames into a TIFF stack (or similar), then import them at the correct (7fps) frame rate into your editor. Then I would apply twixtor or an open-source equivalent to raise the frame rate. How well those work depends somewhat on the amount of motion. 7 fps to 30 fps ...


2

The main two features in transcode with NVENC: A video memory if you want to transcode a many streams and the second one is a GPU. Maxwell Gen 2 this is best at the moment. Regarding licensing limitations: only 2 video transcoding threads can be run simultaneously on a consumer level NVIDIA card, but this regulated on driver level. And with a strong desire ...


2

It's possible that with certain Panasonic or MTS-specific software, the associated files are useful. I've heard of situations where Premiere won't import the footage correctly without the full folder structure. I don't have any MTS folders here at the moment to verify for sure, but it's most likely just metadata that the camera recorded. That being said, ...


1

Don't do anything to the files, Premiere Pro should be able to handle them. Just copy them to a USB drive and hand them off to your editor. NEVER convert your video files prior to editing. You'll lose quality for no reason. If the Mac won't open them, try another media player such as VLC media player. For a PC, I'd say you may need to install Quicktime as ...


1

Leave them as they are. If storage space is limited you could recompress them, but given that the files coming from the DSLR are already compressed, to get an appreciable size reduction you would have to throw away a lot of quality. As you're planning to edit them in the future - meaning another transcoding - this would be a last resort. Buy more hard ...


1

Whatever else you may be facing, one big obstacle is the DVD players themselves. They're not designed to output 1080p. Even if you could get the image onto them in Bluray format, they couldn't output it. (If they're really Bluray players, then you don't need any hacks, just a dupe of the image.) If the content is something they want to see, people will be ...


1

Cropping the video won't help, necessarily. What you need to do is render the video with the proper aspect ratio (roughly 9x16), and at or above the iPhone's native resolution, which is 750x1334 for the iPhone 6. Source: iPhone 6 Screens Demystified It's mainly the aspect ratio that is causing the problem you're seeing. Your video is probably 16x9, which ...


1

This did it for me: avidemux --nogui --load 1.png `for i in {2..15}; do echo "--append $i.png"; done` --no-audio --fps 5 --video-codec Xvid --save-ogm out.ogm --quit I only tried with 15 images, but you can increase the total number if you want. For whatever reason for me it messed up colours a little bit, and i was unable to save into AVI, but hopefully ...



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