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4

Hope this explanation is what you're looking for: When you transcode to an encoding such as H.264 (MPEG-4 part 10) you necessarily also resample the video, that's part of H.264 compression technique. Nontheless, I doubt if this is the reason you experience a timing gap since the resampling doesn't necessarily influence the clock rate of the media. So, I ...


4

As you are hardcoding subtitles, the video (with the subtitles added) will be re-encoded. You can use the CRF rate control method to modulate the quality of the output. So, start with ffmpeg -i grdedFinal.mov -vf subtitles=portSbs.srt -crf 18 -c:a copy gradedFinalwithSubs.mov If the quality's not acceptable, lower that value till it is - in exchange ...


4

The default settings for ffmpeg are very low quality, and since you don't specify any codec or quality parameters it's just using the defaults (I don't know why the devs don't fix that because it generates a lot of questions on forums everywhere). Try adding -c:v libx264 -crf 20 -preset slow to the command. -c:v libx264 tells it to use the libx264 ...


4

Although @stib's advice is sound, I disagree with "to get an appreciable size reduction you would have to throw away a lot of quality". Cameras have to compress on-the-fly, so they use constrained baseline mode, which is to say, they skip most of the tricks that H.264 codec uses to efficiently compress videos. If space isn't a pressing concern, keep them ...


3

Use Avanti with ffmpeg. The former has a job control manager where you drop in multiple files at once and go. You can find webm encoding guide for ffmpeg here: http://trac.ffmpeg.org/wiki/Encode/VP8 Use crf mode encoding and experiment till you get desired size. Set b:v high like 10M and tweak CRF value and if you have no audio, use -an in place of -c:a ...


3

A lot of these answers seem somewhat misleading unfortunately. Forget about getting a capture card. Practically every one has AGC. AGC is very similar to macrovision, except it's superimposed onto any video source. It's impossible to disable unless you use Linux and know your way around hacking drivers. Some cards on Windows have third party tools to ...


3

One big loss in converting VHS to DVD arises from going through the composite domain. Both VHS and MPEG2 use a separated chroma paradigm -- on the VHS tape are two signals, essentially luma and bandwidth-limited chroma. MPEG2 (the standard for DVD) also uses separate luma and chroma. But the standard output from a VHS player combines the signals in a way ...


3

Use this ffmpeg* command: ffmpeg -i "20151105-175532.dad" -c:v copy "20151105-175532.mp4" *get 32-bit static build.


3

Just integrate all filtering into one command: ffmpeg -i input.mp4 \ -filter_complex "[0:v]crop=in_w/2:in_h:0:0 [top]; \ [0:v]crop=in_w/2:in_h:in_w/2:0[bottom]; \ [top][bottom]vstack[outv]" \ -map "[outv]" -map 0:a -c:a copy output_3dv.mp4 Edit: this command below scales and pads the output to 2000x2000 ffmpeg -i input.mp4 \ -filter_complex ...


3

Judge based on the quality rather than the bitrate value. Use CRF mode encoding and if the quality isn't what you can accept, decrease the CRF value. ffmpeg -i "%%a" -s 3840x2610 -c:v libx264 -crf 18 -acodec copy D:\%%~na.mp4


3

Yes, it seems to be a problem of generated timecode. See https://trac.videolan.org/vlc/ticket/12713#no1 Switch to ffmpeg (with a GUI like Avanti) to avoid this issue. My answer to an earlier webm question may guide you on settings.


2

I can't give you specific commands but since these are fairly short I'd extract the individual frames into a TIFF stack (or similar), then import them at the correct (7fps) frame rate into your editor. Then I would apply twixtor or an open-source equivalent to raise the frame rate. How well those work depends somewhat on the amount of motion. 7 fps to 30 fps ...


2

They came in as .ogg?? I thought you converted to dvd? Are you talking about then ripping the DVD video with HandBrake or something? Also, you're doing something wrong, or at least have your file extension -> "open with" settings screwed up if renaming a .ogg to a .mp4 is necessary. Maybe it opens with a different player then, and only the player ...


1

Leave them as they are. If storage space is limited you could recompress them, but given that the files coming from the DSLR are already compressed, to get an appreciable size reduction you would have to throw away a lot of quality. As you're planning to edit them in the future - meaning another transcoding - this would be a last resort. Buy more hard ...


1

Whatever else you may be facing, one big obstacle is the DVD players themselves. They're not designed to output 1080p. Even if you could get the image onto them in Bluray format, they couldn't output it. (If they're really Bluray players, then you don't need any hacks, just a dupe of the image.) If the content is something they want to see, people will be ...


1

Cropping the video won't help, necessarily. What you need to do is render the video with the proper aspect ratio (roughly 9x16), and at or above the iPhone's native resolution, which is 750x1334 for the iPhone 6. Source: iPhone 6 Screens Demystified It's mainly the aspect ratio that is causing the problem you're seeing. Your video is probably 16x9, which ...


1

The best way to conserve the VHS's would be to scan each frame in at the highest quality possible and export to a video file, this would be a very long process and would require some expensive kit or a professional service. If they are historical value and you want the best it would be worth spending the money and getting it done by a pro but that cost is ...


1

If you are looking something that can do that at the same time and is reasonably well developed, then you are probably looking at avconv. It has the same base as ffmpeg, which has already been mentioned, but currently doesn't have a GUI (to the best of my knowledge, i've not gone looking, since i have no need for it). Let's look at an example of how you ...


1

The only way to do it with literally zero mathematical quality loss is to make a gigantic output file with a lossless codec. (e.g. utvideo, FFV1, or x264 in lossless mode (--qp 0). A better solutions that would achieve the same thing is: mux the subtitle file into the mkv, with mkvmerge. You set a flag so it either plays by default or doesn't. Then you'd ...


1

This did it for me: avidemux --nogui --load 1.png `for i in {2..15}; do echo "--append $i.png"; done` --no-audio --fps 5 --video-codec Xvid --save-ogm out.ogm --quit I only tried with 15 images, but you can increase the total number if you want. For whatever reason for me it messed up colours a little bit, and i was unable to save into AVI, but hopefully ...


1

Use ffmpeg instead, e.g. ffmpeg audio.mp4 -framerate 50 -pattern_type glob -i 3_DucksTakeOff_720p50_CgrLevels_SINC_FILTER_SVTdec05_/'*'.sgi -sws_flags lanczos+print_info -c:a copy -c:v libx264 -preset slow -crf 22 -pix_fmt yuv420p output.mkv adjust the input file naming as necessary. ffmpeg can read png just fine. If there are other PNGs in the same dir ...


1

You can use ffprobe (which comes with ffmpeg) to give you info about your movie files from the command line. You may require some shell-fu to convert the output of ffprobe into something you can use though. I've done this in the past; basically I pipe the output of ffprobe to sed or awk to grab the bits of info I need, then use this to drive the parameters ...



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