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7

A really good program you can use is Handbrake. It's a very popular program among so called "pirates" because it's really good at getting a high quality even at tiny file sizes. And this is with good reason, because the main purpose of Handbrake is, indeed, to make the movies small with high quality. Personally I use it when I distribute my short movies on ...


7

The export settings you are using in Final Cut Pro X are preset Compressor settings and the export itself is actually using the Compressor engine (but with no user control). Compressor allows you control over those settings and to save your own custom presets. For instance, you may want to export an MPEG2 file with a particular bitrate, letterbox 16:9 ...


6

Yes, it's possible. What you need to do is demux and remux. Check out free tools like VirtualDub and Any Video Converter to split the original into separate streams, add what you want using Audacity or similar, then re-multiplex them together using a tool like AviMux. The video can remain unchanged.


5

What you are missing is that not every frame is stored as a picture. A large number of frames are stored simply by keeping track of what changed from the previous picture. If you think about most video, not a whole lot is actually changing since the majority of the scene stays the same or moves in a similar pattern. By describing only the changes, the ...


5

What is your definition of huge and what is your definition of high quality? Size is directly related to compression and compression is directly inversely related to quality for the most part. Some amount of compression can be had for free using lossless compression or near free with more efficient pattern finding for lossy compression, but for the most ...


5

Well going by the numbers h264 has a lesser bit-depth and color accuracy than ProRes 422. PR422 has 10bit and 4:2:2 chroma sub-sampling, h264 has 8bit and 4:2:0 unless you encode in the Hi422P Intra profile which isn't very well supported in the wild but offers 10bit and 4:2:2. So in that case I don't think you will have any difference what so ever between ...


4

The short answer is "No." DVD by definition is limited to 720x480 video with a fairly low bitrate, compressed specifically with MPEG-2. There is absolutely no way to make your HD video look just as good with those constraints. Some DVD players do let you play .mp4, .mkv, or whatever files that happen to be stored on a DVD, but that isn't a standard ...


4

The key is to dial in the bitrate - you'll need about 800kbps video with 100kbps audio to hit 200MB. That's low for for SD resolution, but it might be good enough for you. Also look for software that has an option for 2-pass encoding. Try Expression Encoder, Adobe Media Encoder, or Sorenson Squeeze.


3

I assume the actual data rate is 3.3 Mb/s, not MB/s (bits, not bytes). This is very low for 1080p60, and artifacts are likely at such a low rate. You might consider capturing at at least double that rate. Alternatively (or also), halving the frame rate to 29.97 would double the effective bit rate. You would be trading some motion artifacting for less ...


3

First we need a primer on I, P and B frames. An I frame is a frame that is a completely independant picture of the frame. It doesn't depend on any other frames and is a frame which B and P frames are based on. A P frame stores only the changes from the previous frame and a B frame stores only the changes in either direction. IPB uses a mix of all 3 frame ...


3

Unacceptable is in the eye of the watcher, so that part is tough to answer. Distinguishable is easier: yes, there will be a difference. It will not be obvious in every frame or circumstance, but it will be there. If you simply truncate the lowest bit, it will raise the noise floor and the effect will be most evident in low light areas. So, it will look ...


3

I've answered a similar question some time ago. YouTube added a few codecs since then but all the info there still applys: What codec will my Youtube uploads be output in and what codec should I use to upload? Short answer: Yes if you are concerned about maximum quality a lossless codec or visually lossless codec is the way to go. Re-encoding always means ...


3

H264 is actually a pretty good codec for such content. Its based on motion vectors and you can define in which intervals the codec should encode a full frame, everything in between will be based on the last and next keyframe (simplifying here). x264 is probably the best h264 encoder out there and luckily open source. Probably the best way to use it is ...


2

it is a problem with gamma settings youre using and QT has its own gamma settings, dont bother. it will display only in QT that way... also check for alphas, but im not so sure that mp4 can support alpha channels... only qt mov with animation codec has alpha.... as i know...


2

Compression codecs and methods are also based extensively in the field of Psychoacoustics. For this, I thoroughly recommend the books available from the Focal Press, such as this one


2

A single layer DVD has about 4.5 GB of capacity, a dual layer DVD has about 8.5 GB of capacity. Some of this space is taken up by menus and special features, but that still leaves plenty of room for video with minimal compression. Take a look at the "blocky" videos - they have probably been re-compressed down to 700MB (so they can fit on a CD-R blank) or ...


2

Vantolinomo - You might just be experiencing 'gamma shift' which can happen when you are exporting to H264 video. You can find a tutorial to fix this here: http://www.videocopilot.net/blog/2008/06/fix-quicktime-gamma-shift/


2

There is no way around needing more data rate to capture that much video information. It sounds like the camera probably isn't actually capable of delivering 1080P/60 but that they use a very low quality version so they can slap the label on the box. Data rates are generally measured in Mb(bits)/sec rather than MB/s, but even if your suggested rate ...


2

Your best bet for high quality and low size is 2 pass variable bit rate, but it is worth noting that the size of the video also has a ton to do with how much motion it contains and how often the scene changes. One of the most popular modern codecs to use for such compression is h.264. Video compression works by looking for similarities not only within one ...


2

Taking a closer look at the footage now that I'm at home, it's mostly the level of activity and motion in the shots. Even in the Sony video, the quality absolutely falls apart any time that there is high motion and unstable video. The way video compression works, it depends on predictable and smooth motion to achieve good compression results, especially ...


2

The lines may come from the fact that you have exported the video with interlacing. You should generally avoid interlacing for any digital end-user medium. To find out about certain technical aspects of a video, the program MediaInfo is a very handy tool that can tell you a lot about the specs of your video, including basics like video resolution and ...


2

For CBR encodings, the bitrate is always kept at the bitrate specified regardless of if it is needed. For VBR encoding, the bitrate is an average target, however the media stream will use more or less data rate when it needs to but will try to average to the target. This is why you see 1 pass and 2 pass VBR. 2 pass VBR first makes a pass to estimate where ...


2

When you ask how something will 'look' you're in the realm of the subjective. Things 'look' different to experienced professionals than they might to the average viewer. But still, the 1080p video will not be as good no matter what you view it on. When you encode at a low bit rate you aren't removing pixels, you're mostly removing high frequencies. Doing ...


2

Has anyone done or seen any tests comparing Apple ProRes 422 with high-bitrate H.264? No, but I can tell you that x264 can get as close to lossless as you want (or even mathematically lossless, with -qp 0). x264 can produce h.264 streams in 4:2:0, 4:2:2, or 4:4:4 YUV colorspaces, at 8 or 10 bits per component. (It can also do RGB, but unless you're ...


2

You would use FFmpeg for that. It requires that you are a bit familiar with using command line applications but even if you are not its really not complicated. The things you want to do have been covered in these questions (and probably others): Why does quality degrade so much if just cutting video with ffmpeg? (different topic but the answer tells you ...


2

I use Compressor for final outputs of my films, it does give a better end result due to the compression techniques. When you use the "Share" option from FCPX it uses the basic Quicktime compression and exporting options which only give a a few export formats to choose, mainly designed to work with apple products. Compressor does give you a lot more options ...


2

Format doesn't really matter, I usually use something fairly common like .mov or .mp4. The more important thing is the codec. Usually when exporting for online upload, H.264 is the most common codec because of its balance of size and quality. For resolution, either 1080p or 720p. Most people can't tell the difference between the two, but 1080p is the ...


2

summary: yes, depending on content, with a good encoder h.264 can look pretty good at 240kib/s video bitrate, at NTSC 720x480p30. With modern codecs, you don't need to downscale the rez too far. If there isn't a lot of noise in your source, you're just putting the same complexity into fewer pixels. You shouldn't encode 1080p at 270kb/s, though :P. There ...


2

Any decent encoder can hit a target bitrate (with 2pass), but still spend the bits intelligently to achieve similar quality throughout the file. x264 2pass figures out what CRF will give the desired bitrate (pass1), and then uses it (pass2). (source: Dark Shikari. cf. the links I dug up for my answer on this question about VBR streaming). You only get ...


1

You can see the bitrate in this case as a quality target. It will not encode the audio strictly at that bit-rate but try to encode the audio in a way that it will always be "near" your specified bit-rate. Usually you can translate certain bit-rates to a specific quality level which can be compared to lames "V0", "V2" etc. VBR settings, these presets don't ...



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