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6

I am not an experienced colorist but I believe I can provide you with some answers. At least from an indie filmmaker's point of view. Wait until you have the final cut (or lock-off cut) before you grade. Grading usually happens at the same time as the sound design as both require a locked-off cut. It is best to wait until this stage so that you don't have ...


5

There's a loose binning of monitors into 3 categories: Consumer equipment [$500 - $1500] Dell U-Series LCDs, Panasonic Viera Plasmas Entry-Level Monitors [$2500+] FSI, HP DreamColor High End Monitors [$$ - $$$$] eCinema, TV Logic Some of the features of non-consumer monitors that you'll want to learn about are: HD/SDI inputs Additional outputs ...


5

I can't give an After-Effects specific answer, but maybe this will help.. 1 - If you want to color a specific part of the image, deal with "region based filtering." In DaVinci-speak, that's Power Windows. Masks, Shapes, Roto. However you phrase it. That's how you tell the computer what part of the image you want to effect. Tie the mask to a tracker so ...


3

Let me start by saying what they did there is actually far, Far, FAR simpler than you think. I'll try to break it down shot by shot what is going on. On the title, there are three main elements. The first element fades in on a time lapse of clouds moving across the mountain. This appears to be the same time lapse they use a few seconds later for the ...


3

This is a well-known bug when exporting to H.264. Unfortunately, I'm not clever enough to understand why this happens, but it's a side effect of using the codec. I'll keep looking for an explanation I understand, however I wanted to get this answer out there. As a workaround for now, I suggest making a quick little eyeball adjustment to the comp's colour ...


3

Any workflow that works for you is "correct". I don't see any obvious problems with your proposed workflow, though I would think you would want to do sound after VFX so that it can be properly timed to the VFX. Depending on the software you are using, you may not have to lock the shots but may actually be able to move directly in to working on the shots. ...


3

The CineStyle picture style provides you with a flat, desaturated image: providing the best dynamic range of any of the picture styles for Canon DSLRs. Technicolor provide you with a file that you can apparently import into your editing software to help you grade your footage. However, I never figured out how to use it and frankly, I don't think one needs ...


3

The biggest factor in planning for aggressive grading is your wardrobe and set design. Eric Escobar gave an excellent speech about this in 2009 at the SF Supermeet, which the MacVideo guys made available online: "Plug-ins Won't Save You". I know this isn't the technical solution you were looking for, but the nature of contrast and saturation is that ...


3

Finding non-linear editors on a computer can be really hard. The linear approach in the old days was actually a forced limitation due to the restrictions you had with tapes. You needed to add clips successively. Sure, you could make an insert but at the risk of messing up the time-base and other things. That being said - the non-linear/linear is not the ...


3

Generally speaking yes. This makes it easier for your camera to define the correct colors. Normally you gain experience best by committing errors or by analyzing the errors of others. So, if you see an image that is too cold, the color temperature / white balance should be higher. If it's too warm, the color temperature should be lower. If you have two ...


3

Consistent camera settings are a good beginning for continuous looking footage. Here below I will try to explain how to achieve consistent brightness and colour of footage. Consistent brightness Assuming that the lighting of the scene stays the same, you can pick a shutter speed, aperture and ISO that gives you a desired exposure. If in the next recording ...


2

As it was shot by its creators is kind of a nebulous concept, particularly when compression is involved. Color reproduction varies greatly from one device to another and without a calibrated display and a complete chain of color control going back to the source, you aren't going to get exact. Even then, chances are good that somewhere along the line the ...


2

It depends entirely on what you are looking for. If you want an image that appears consistently lit, then you will want to have uniform light temperature. If however, you want to have some type of effect lighting, you will want to alter the lighting temperature. Say for example you have a candle in the scene (or want to allude to a fire off-screen), or ...


2

Unfortunately, even if you could get an exact amount of the difference, it is highly unlikely that adjusting by that amount will fix your problem. Since a lossy compression is being used, the codec is deciding to alter the color to something that is more easily stored in a small space. You will likely get a different color artifact if you try to correct ...


2

The standard way to deal with this is to use color calibration. Unfortunately, color accuracy on consumer devices tends to be all over the charts. There is no way to guarantee that the color will be similar, even on multiple of the same model of device, or even on the same exact device over time. Thus, the best practice is to setup a color calibrated ...


2

I'll echo AJ on most of his response, but I would caution against doing color correction after compositing unless the elements are already fairly congruent. Ideally you would apply at least gross color correction to each layer or element. The notion of shooting 'flat' or low contrast IMO is a holdover from film, where you could pull contrast from the ...


2

Vantolinomo - You might just be experiencing 'gamma shift' which can happen when you are exporting to H264 video. You can find a tutorial to fix this here: http://www.videocopilot.net/blog/2008/06/fix-quicktime-gamma-shift/


1

You may be able to simply use an adjustment layer in Adobe Premiere Pro and use the Three Way Color corrector to deal with this. It is similar to editing a still in Adobe Photoshop. You will want to adjust the levels initially then the tonal range and possibly the curves. If that doesn't work, then the next step would be to try to incorporate masking. If ...


1

It looks like it is probably something graphic driver related. The Mac Book Pro Retina screen shots look almost identical to what I see on my color calibrated environment when I look at the video you have posted on your site. Looks like the playback screen is probably recognized as a video playback by whatever color corrections are going on on the Dell ...


1

This is not the auto white balance screwing up. This is the way that SCUBA footage looks without artificial light. Even shooting with my SeaLife DC1400 which has specialized underwater white balance settings, you get a strong color cast, particularly in green water. Water doesn't block frequencies of light evenly and as depth increases, much of the red ...


1

Unlike print graphics there is no way of really controlling the colour in video as seen by the final user, unless you know the profiles of all the devices it will be played on. The best you can do is that your material is properly exposed and balanced to give it the best chance out there in the cruel world. Using scopes is the objective way to test your ...


1

Probably not easily. You might be able to try applying a better auto-white balance and hope for the best. You could also manually adjust it repeatedly and adjust the interpolation between values (on the animation curves) but this is highly time consuming and still won't get as good of a result as reshooting. If reshooting is an option, it's going to ...


1

What you are trying to do is impossible given how bad the original footage is. I'm honestly pretty amazed at the result in the third shot given the original state. Unfortunately, video frames are the equivalent of a series of JPEG images. It is possible to shoot RAW video on ultra high end cameras, but the data rates are completely off the charts (around ...


1

It is because you are calibrating the monitor correctly however the other two, The Sony LCD and the Computer are probably not correctly color calibrated in the same way, I know that my laptop seems to desaturate colors around the 30% mark and when compared to a calibrated monitor it looks quite a bit different...I would assume this would account for why they ...


1

If all is correct you enable the multi camera mode on a sequence containing the different angles in different tracks as shown in the image below (this is CS5.5, but CS6 is similar). The image shows a sequence containing 4 different clips which represent 4 different angles. In this example these are just a collection of random footage, but it works the same ...


1

Without knowing the exact result of this, if I where you I would give the GBDeflicker a shot (plugin for AE Win/Mac and stand-alone application): http://www.granitebaysoftware.com/products/productgbd.aspx This is a software meant to solve time-lapse flickering by averaging the luminance of the scene over time. For the video you showed as an example this ...


1

This might be better suited as a comment to your original post, but alas I do not yet have those privilegies. Anyway, my answer to you would be a cliché one: Keep tinkering. It's really a matter of finding out what effects Premiere can offer, deciding which will be able to assist you the most and then going back and forth between them until you find a ...


1

Consider the Matrox MXO2 products. The Mini model allows you to gain blue gun control of a normal consumer HDTV, solving the big issue with calibration of these large displays. The MXO2 Mini is under $500, other models include features like hardware H.264 encoding and more advanced interfaces.



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