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7

I am not an experienced colorist but I believe I can provide you with some answers. At least from an indie filmmaker's point of view. Wait until you have the final cut (or lock-off cut) before you grade. Grading usually happens at the same time as the sound design as both require a locked-off cut. It is best to wait until this stage so that you don't have ...


5

Xudonax, The preset Final Cut Pro XML Round-Trip renders the graded files in ProRes 422, but it uses an old XML file, not supported in FCPX. You need to go to the Edit (important!) section of DaVinci after rendering the project. Then you will be need to make File – Export AAF, XML... command and check the fcpxml version 1.3 type of file. It will be ...


5

I can't give an After-Effects specific answer, but maybe this will help.. 1 - If you want to color a specific part of the image, deal with "region based filtering." In DaVinci-speak, that's Power Windows. Masks, Shapes, Roto. However you phrase it. That's how you tell the computer what part of the image you want to effect. Tie the mask to a tracker so ...


5

There's a loose binning of monitors into 3 categories: Consumer equipment [$500 - $1500] Dell U-Series LCDs, Panasonic Viera Plasmas Entry-Level Monitors [$2500+] FSI, HP DreamColor High End Monitors [$$ - $$$$] eCinema, TV Logic Some of the features of non-consumer monitors that you'll want to learn about are: HD/SDI inputs Additional outputs ...


4

No most video formats (nearly all) do not allow custom ICC color profiles to be embedded. most video on the consumer end is intended for the REC.709 color space. sRGB is similar and uses the same primaries. transcoding (including compressing) will almost always result is a slight shift in color accuracy, saturation, gamma curve, or black and white level ...


4

Let me start by saying what they did there is actually far, Far, FAR simpler than you think. I'll try to break it down shot by shot what is going on. On the title, there are three main elements. The first element fades in on a time lapse of clouds moving across the mountain. This appears to be the same time lapse they use a few seconds later for the ...


4

This is a well-known bug when exporting to H.264. Unfortunately, I'm not clever enough to understand why this happens, but it's a side effect of using the codec. I'll keep looking for an explanation I understand, however I wanted to get this answer out there. As a workaround for now, I suggest making a quick little eyeball adjustment to the comp's colour ...


4

There are two schools of thought on this topic but nothing I know has suggested that shooting with a flat profile is a bad thing. Here is what I understand: 1) When shooting with Canon DSLRs, it's generally advised that you shoot with a flat profile (Technicolor cinestyle, Prolost, etc.) and over expose (but don't clip!!) and you get a picture with much ...


4

I have not seen any movie that used any onset technqiuqes for this look. Of course you want the lighting to give away a certain mood to begin with but there are no special filters needed. For the post production workflow, there is a great plugin for several video tools like After Effects, Premiere and Final Cut from Red Giant called Mojo that makes it ...


3

Generally speaking yes. This makes it easier for your camera to define the correct colors. Normally you gain experience best by committing errors or by analyzing the errors of others. So, if you see an image that is too cold, the color temperature / white balance should be higher. If it's too warm, the color temperature should be lower. If you have two ...


3

Any workflow that works for you is "correct". I don't see any obvious problems with your proposed workflow, though I would think you would want to do sound after VFX so that it can be properly timed to the VFX. Depending on the software you are using, you may not have to lock the shots but may actually be able to move directly in to working on the shots. ...


3

The CineStyle picture style provides you with a flat, desaturated image: providing the best dynamic range of any of the picture styles for Canon DSLRs. Technicolor provide you with a file that you can apparently import into your editing software to help you grade your footage. However, I never figured out how to use it and frankly, I don't think one needs ...


3

The biggest factor in planning for aggressive grading is your wardrobe and set design. Eric Escobar gave an excellent speech about this in 2009 at the SF Supermeet, which the MacVideo guys made available online: "Plug-ins Won't Save You". I know this isn't the technical solution you were looking for, but the nature of contrast and saturation is that ...


3

Finding non-linear editors on a computer can be really hard. The linear approach in the old days was actually a forced limitation due to the restrictions you had with tapes. You needed to add clips successively. Sure, you could make an insert but at the risk of messing up the time-base and other things. That being said - the non-linear/linear is not the ...


3

Consistent camera settings are a good beginning for continuous looking footage. Here below I will try to explain how to achieve consistent brightness and colour of footage. Consistent brightness Assuming that the lighting of the scene stays the same, you can pick a shutter speed, aperture and ISO that gives you a desired exposure. If in the next recording ...


3

Depending on the fidelity of the video you can try to do a high pass filter on the video, in essence it will sharpen edges of the scene and help bring it out. The two steps I would do: 1) De-noise it (I use the neat video plugin for after effects) 2) Run a high pass filter (photoshop has this, but not after effects). To emulate this: a) Create a ...


3

The cheapest tool is to use a desk lamp and light the scene better to begin with and use the white balance setting in the webcam software itself. It's a lot harder after the fact (if sufficient detail is even saved in the video to fix it at all). You could also try DaVinci Resolve Lite, it's a professional color grading and correction package that also ...


2

Unfortunately, even if you could get an exact amount of the difference, it is highly unlikely that adjusting by that amount will fix your problem. Since a lossy compression is being used, the codec is deciding to alter the color to something that is more easily stored in a small space. You will likely get a different color artifact if you try to correct ...


2

As it was shot by its creators is kind of a nebulous concept, particularly when compression is involved. Color reproduction varies greatly from one device to another and without a calibrated display and a complete chain of color control going back to the source, you aren't going to get exact. Even then, chances are good that somewhere along the line the ...


2

The standard way to deal with this is to use color calibration. Unfortunately, color accuracy on consumer devices tends to be all over the charts. There is no way to guarantee that the color will be similar, even on multiple of the same model of device, or even on the same exact device over time. Thus, the best practice is to setup a color calibrated ...


2

I would imagine it has something to do with the white point/primary chromaticities are Alexa Wide Gamut vs. Rec709. http://www.arri.com/camera/alexa/learn/log_c_and_rec_709_video


2

Vantolinomo - You might just be experiencing 'gamma shift' which can happen when you are exporting to H264 video. You can find a tutorial to fix this here: http://www.videocopilot.net/blog/2008/06/fix-quicktime-gamma-shift/


2

It depends entirely on what you are looking for. If you want an image that appears consistently lit, then you will want to have uniform light temperature. If however, you want to have some type of effect lighting, you will want to alter the lighting temperature. Say for example you have a candle in the scene (or want to allude to a fire off-screen), or ...


2

⌘-D will disable the currently selected node. Resolve really doesn't like to have loose nodes floating around, so either disable them, or delete them. But since you're talking about creating a new, experimental node structure, what you really want to do is create a new local version. Right click on the clip thumbnail and select Local versions-> create new ...


2

There isn't really a magic "enhance" button like on CSI. If there isn't enough information to see even part of the numbers (at least a blur where they are) then it is impossible to tell what is there because the information simply was not captured. It is most likely clipping, which means that everything in that area is the maximum possible whiteness and ...


2

To add onto what Professor Sparkles said and to give more of a specific answer to your question, I believe this is done entirely in post (but I could be wrong because I have no experience on set). If anything, one could definitely reproduce this (or very close to it) in post by performing a few things: Remove Noise Balance your R,B,G channels Juice the ...


2

Blender's compositor will do exactly what you want, just enter the compositor (on the right of the help button on the menu, change default to compositor) check nodes and backdrop, add your video as input (press shift+A on the the compositing window) you can remove the render node since you are not using 3D, press shift+CTRL+left_mouse_button on the input ...


1

I'll echo AJ on most of his response, but I would caution against doing color correction after compositing unless the elements are already fairly congruent. Ideally you would apply at least gross color correction to each layer or element. The notion of shooting 'flat' or low contrast IMO is a holdover from film, where you could pull contrast from the ...


1

You may be able to simply use an adjustment layer in Adobe Premiere Pro and use the Three Way Color corrector to deal with this. It is similar to editing a still in Adobe Photoshop. You will want to adjust the levels initially then the tonal range and possibly the curves. If that doesn't work, then the next step would be to try to incorporate masking. If ...


1

It looks like it is probably something graphic driver related. The Mac Book Pro Retina screen shots look almost identical to what I see on my color calibrated environment when I look at the video you have posted on your site. Looks like the playback screen is probably recognized as a video playback by whatever color corrections are going on on the Dell ...



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