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3

Use this ffmpeg* command: ffmpeg -i "20151105-175532.dad" -c:v copy "20151105-175532.mp4" *get 32-bit static build.


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MPEG -TS. See here: All MPEG-2 TS operations from GPAC (client and MP42TS) are supported on HEVC. MP42TS can be used to generate TS files usable for DASH or for injection in modulation chains; it can also be used to send the TS over an UDP or RTP stream in unicast or multicast mode


3

I haven't used VLC as my primary player since 2007. I switched over initially to KMPlayer and then Potplayer. Potplayer allows fairly flexible splitter and codec assignment for decoding. It also sports a whole host of video and audio processing filters. In fact, I believe that one can use Avisynth filters to process the video during playback, too.


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The order of the components in RGB32 seems to do with endianness: PIX_FMT_RGB32 is handled in an endian-specific manner. An RGBA color is put together as: (A << 24) | (R << 16) | (G << 8) | B This is stored as BGRA on little-endian CPU architectures and ARGB on big-endian CPUs. The descriptions of the various related formats ...


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While I always guessed that the big / little endian was more a matter of patents rather than performance, Nope little endian was developed as a performance optimization whern moving to multi byte words. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endianness#Optimization Nothing to to with patents. Different representation have different advantages and disadvantage. ...


3

Has anyone done or seen any tests comparing Apple ProRes 422 with high-bitrate H.264? No, but I can tell you that x264 can get as close to lossless as you want (or even mathematically lossless, with -qp 0). x264 can produce h.264 streams in 4:2:0, 4:2:2, or 4:4:4 YUV colorspaces, at 8 or 10 bits per component. (It can also do RGB, but unless you're ...


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What is Ogg Skeleton? From Ogg Skeleton 4: Ogg Skeleton provides structuring information for multitrack Ogg files. It is compatible with Ogg Theora and provides extra clues for synchronization and content negotiation such as language selection. The latest version of Skeleton, version 4.0, also provides keyframe indexes to enable optimal seeking ...


2

What you want is a very long GOP or I-frame interval. I believe the ffmpeg option -g nnnn will do that, where nnnn is the length of your video in frames. I don't know how to specify "no B-frames", and this will certainly all be codec-dependent. Give it a try.


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The answer is No. Besides the frame dimensions, there's the matter of content complexity. Without scanning the video and doing a first-pass as it were, it's not possible to predict the output size. A video consisting of a slideshow of very simple text slides will be much easier to compress than scenes of busy city life..etc. The closest you may come to ...


2

I get the same result with your commands, however if I skip the pixel format conversion and use the input pixel format 'bgr0', then except for an initial frame drop, I get no further drops. Note that tune is a x264 parameter - it has no relevance for FFV1. And if I use gdigrab (my preferred grabbing device), I get no frame drops at all, even with bgra:- ...


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You can use ffmpeg to perform this conversion. Grab the 32-bit static build from here. And run the following command from the command prompt: ffmpeg -i "c:\path\to\input.avi" -c:v libxvid -vtag xvid -qscale:v 3 -c:a libmp3lame -qscale:a 4 output.avi You can experiment with the value of qscale:v to get the quality or file size that you need. Values from 1 ...


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The correctness of this statement depends on the color model. The statement will typically be correct for color models such as RGB and CMY. In HSx (HSV, HSL) color models the model doesn't store explicit colors, and their transformation to explicit colors is non-linear. EDIT: My comment below on YUV is incorrect, YUV transforms linearly to RGB, thanks ...


1

If by linear scale, the (Cinelerra manual) "saying" means gamma = 1.0, then that's not my understanding of most video codecs. GPUs, OTOH, probably do operate upon values decoded and stored as a linear representation of a higher precision than the source, which would be typically 8-bits per channel.


1

Difficult to reply without knowing if you aiming for a full lossless codec or a lossy one can go too. You talk of H264, but this codec can also be used in a lossless way. If it was for me, and storage doesn't matter I would go for a true (pixel per pixel) lossless codec. Here, excluding some other "good but insane storage hungry" lossless codecs your ...


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Seems that Snapchat allows to select multiple clips of different parameters and stitch them together as one MP4. Like you said, it plays fine in VLC, but ffplay here warns that [mov,mp4,m4a,3gp,3g2,mj2 @ 00000000005b0a00] Concatenated H.264 or H.265 might not play correctly. [mov,mp4,m4a,3gp,3g2,mj2 @> 00000000005ba100] ignoring multiple glbl ...


1

You need to change the encoding settings. By default, AE uses the AVI animation codec, which is very good at retaining quality but creates incredibly large files. Using an intermediary codec like Apple Prores, Avid DNxHR, or GrassValley HQx would give you visually equivalent quality with a significantly smaller file size. If that file size isn't small ...


1

To be frank, beginners and semi-pros will be capturing their videos on smartphones or consumer-level camcorders. And contemporary ones all record their videos as H264 in MP4 or MOV. The only other candidate is MJPEG in AVI for videos taken with older devices If it's legally possible, I'd suggest bundling Avisynth along with your software and coding ...


1

After effects should take in the image sequence just fine. No reason to run it through Vdub first. Let me know how it works out for you, it sounds like a very interesting project.


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Exporting to H264 will always introduce a slight colour shift due to a gamma tag in the file header. At least, I didn't find any solution to export without a gamma shift. Neither in AE nor in any other video editing program. Maybe also have a look at this answer: http://video.stackexchange.com/a/10336/11423


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They are all forms of hardware acceleration, which broadly, just means that specialized hardware is doing things faster than the basic CPU normally could. The exact nature of what each type of acceleration does depends entirely on the software you are using and the hardware you are using. Some hardware is very purpose specific. Something like Intel ...


1

I read up a bit and made some experiments with lossless codecs, getting decent results. I'd be interested in comments on this, especially if there are lossless or lossy alternatives that I overlooked. I tried the following codecs / formats in ffmpeg: Lossless Motion JPEG2000 / AVI ffmpeg -i test.avi -vcodec jpeg2000 -strict -2 -pred 1 test_jpeg2000.avi ...


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Well first off, the C100 Mk I DOES NOT offer an MP4 option, only a AVCHD option. I'm assuming you meant the MKII as you said 'recently bought'. If you look at the specs of the C100 MK II you'll see in MP4 mode you can't record interlaced, but in AVCHD you can (but you don't have to if you are at 28 mbps). So basically you can't go wrong (aka get interlaced ...


1

The first frame of a video from any codec will always be an I frame. There is no previous picture for other frame types to use as a reference. B frames might still work. The video will start to distort ahead of the cut point, too, if any B frames are trying to reference a future frame that's not there anymore. Actually, with B frames present, display ...


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I have used both on my Ninja Blade with my C100, no real difference in quality across drastically different circumstances (night vs day). Pro Res works better on Mac, DNXHD works better on Windows. It all comes down to your OS, and whether you have to share the files with broadcasters (in which case I would use DNX as a lot of editors use Avid). Other then ...


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AVCHD appears to just be h.264 with some constraints. Mainly on framerate and resolution. It looks from the wikipedia page that early versions mostly favoured interlaced encoding, unless you drop down to 720p. The wiki page doesn't say, but I assume it's H.264 4:2:0 8-bit, not Hi10 profile or something. I also have no idea what quality the hardware ...


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You focus on quality in your question, so the answer is clear: ProRes (in various flavors) offers superior quality. There are other reasons you might choose AVCHD, but they don't relate to quality. AVCHD is generally speaking a distribution format, while ProRes is more an acquisition and intermediate format (it uses all I-frames). ProRes also comes in a ...


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I think MeGUI is supposed to be a good front-end for x264 encoding. (x264 is the same h.264 encoder that VLC uses.) I don't know anything about powerdirector, so all I can say is that x264 is the best h.264 encoder (best quality vs. bitrate vs. cpu time tradeoff), and it's free. It's what you should use to make files for upload to youtube. (Use lots of ...


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The problem is probably not WMP but the Microsoft MPEG-1 codec. The straight forward solution other than using a decent player is to use a better codec pack - ffdshow, it feeds WMP through the operating system level. Besides the seek issue you'll probably get better playback performance, and it doesn't require any end-user involvement - they continue to use ...


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Only Prores 4444 supports alpha channels, see the manual: The Apple ProRes 4444 codec offers the utmost possible quality for 4:4:4 sources and for workflows involving alpha channels. It seems to work for me, using the Animation codec with "Millions of Colors+". I'm on a Mac using Adobe CC. Here are the steps I took: Export your AE comp using ...


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When exporting from Premiere there is a checkbox that says "match sequence settings" which will use the same format as your source video. The "best quality" checkbox is Premiere does not refer to the codec, but to the internal scaling algorithms.



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