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What you want is a very long GOP or I-frame interval. I believe the ffmpeg option -g nnnn will do that, where nnnn is the length of your video in frames. I don't know how to specify "no B-frames", and this will certainly all be codec-dependent. Give it a try.


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The first frame of a video from any codec will always be an I frame. There is no previous picture for other frame types to use as a reference. B frames might still work. The video will start to distort ahead of the cut point, too, if any B frames are trying to reference a future frame that's not there anymore. Actually, with B frames present, display ...


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AVCHD appears to just be h.264 with some constraints. Mainly on framerate and resolution. It looks from the wikipedia page that early versions mostly favoured interlaced encoding, unless you drop down to 720p. The wiki page doesn't say, but I assume it's H.264 4:2:0 8-bit, not Hi10 profile or something. I also have no idea what quality the hardware ...


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You focus on quality in your question, so the answer is clear: ProRes (in various flavors) offers superior quality. There are other reasons you might choose AVCHD, but they don't relate to quality. AVCHD is generally speaking a distribution format, while ProRes is more an acquisition and intermediate format (it uses all I-frames). ProRes also comes in a ...


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I think MeGUI is supposed to be a good front-end for x264 encoding. (x264 is the same h.264 encoder that VLC uses.) I don't know anything about powerdirector, so all I can say is that x264 is the best h.264 encoder (best quality vs. bitrate vs. cpu time tradeoff), and it's free. It's what you should use to make files for upload to youtube. (Use lots of ...


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When exporting from Premiere there is a checkbox that says "match sequence settings" which will use the same format as your source video. The "best quality" checkbox is Premiere does not refer to the codec, but to the internal scaling algorithms.


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Yes, some encoders allow changing parameters (like target quality or bitrate, or psychovisual tuning options (x264's aq and psy-rd options). x264, the stand-alone command-line frontend for the library, has a --zones parameter to give more bitrate to some parts of the video. So you could for example reduce the quality for the credits. The actual x264 ...



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