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4

You don't say what you're using to edit these videos, but there may be a better chromakey plugin for your platform than what comes natively. Also, again depending on your platform, most editors will allow you to crop the key area (garbage matte) so that the green screen doesn't have to cover the entire raster, just enough to back the product you're ...


4

There are a zillion greenscreen tutorials on YouTube. The basics are simple. 1.Pure green paint or fabric. 2.Even lighting on the green, good lighting technique on the subject. Avoid spills and shadows. 3.Use the highest quality camera, lenses and compression you have available -- but don't freak out unless you're using a lot of translucent objects like ...


2

Even a typical lamp with a "daylight"-colored bulb in it can act as a lighting source for your product. I'm sure your boss could spring for one light bulb! If you shoot again with the new lighting, or even without the new lighting, play around with the angle of your product / camera / stool to minimize the reflections.


2

I have a couple of suggestions that could be of help: 1) Use a polarizer to reduce reflections. You say your boss won't spring for anything else, but you can pick one up fairly cheaply (like under $20 on amazon). If that's really not an option, you can try using some polarized sunglasses in front of the lens, at least to see if it eliminates the ...


2

There isn't a right or wrong answer here I don't think. Both approaches have advantages. Keying at 1080p will give you clearer detail when trying to find edges, but also will have more noise that could throw off a key. Additionally, the downscale after the key will apply a slight blur to the image further disguising the edges to make the keying less ...


2

This might be an issue with the Vegas chroma key program removing green from all objects and making it transparent rather than finding only solid green and modifying that. Someone may know how to fix this in Vegas, but if all else fails you can run your keyed footage through a program like Davinci Resolve Lite (free) and correct the colors.


2

This is quite simple. Use any keyer of your choice that can give you a good mask for the layer, then place an "Alpha Adjust" layer below it in the Effects control and click the "Invert Alpha" checkbox. This will invert the alpha channel produced by the keyer and reverse the effect the way you are looking for.


1

The problem is that my alpha Mask has a feather. Which results in greeen peaking through the Mask. So the only solutions are export an alpha mask with no feather or export the original image with a black or desaturated background.


1

Part of it may be the fact you are using JPEG sequences. JPEG isn't a pixel accurate format and you are going to have some differences in block quantization that could potentially result in mismatches. I don't think that is the only issue since it is a bit too regular for it to be the only issue, but I'd try to use an intermediate format that is a bit more ...


1

I would guess that it is trying to correct for green highlights in the chromakeyed video and overdoing it. It's relatively common for green screen footage to have greenish reflections due to light bouncing off the green wall back on to subjects. The chroma-key effect may be attempting to automatically correct this and catching objects that have no such ...


1

What you're looking for is a difference matte. (Not to be confused with a Color Difference Key which is similar to regular chroma key.) It can certainly be done, though you should know that difference mattes are fairly temperamental. The way it works is by finding the difference between an image and each frame of video, and removing anything that's the ...



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