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10

How important is sharpness? 1080p video is barely 2 megapixels, so it would stand to reason that an ultra-sharp lens is not really necessary to get sharp-looking video. Is this an accurate assumption? It depends on the way the DSLR is capturing it's video from the sensor. The first method is the most obvious one, take the image and scale it, but there's ...


5

The squares in a row on the right represent the buffer memory of your camera. When you are recording video the data goes roughly as follows: Sensor -> Buffer memory -> Memory card When the last square turns red it means the buffer is full. This is caused by the fact that the buffer memory could not move it's contents to the memory card fast enough. ...


4

While reviewing the Instruction Manual for the Canon 2Ti EOS 550 on page 127 you will find information on how to manually set the shutter time. Here is the pdf download for the manual: http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/9/0300003169/01/eosrt2i-eos550d-im-en.pdf There is wide range of 1/4000 to 1/30 of a second to work with depending on your frame rate. For 50 fps ...


4

The default video files made by most Canon DSLRs is an H264 video file in an MOV container. Decoding high definition video at the data rates that most Canon cameras use is intensive for both memory, disk and CPU unless you have a dedicated decoder chip. Your iPod Touch uses flash storage (which is fast) and has H264 decoding capability to make it run ...


3

On DSLRs, a fast shutter can actually be better. DSLRs scan the image to sample rather than capturing the whole frame at once. This is why you get a distortion when you do a rapid pan. A faster shutter will result in crisper motion (less motion blur), which can seem a little harsher than the softness of film, but it also reduces the amount of distortion ...


3

So after 8 hours of research, trial and error, I found a successful workflow for .mov footage from my Canon EOS Rebel T3i. The first part is that you can't import .mov "Apple / H264" files with Lightworks without purchasing the "Pro" version. The pro version costs $60 per year (which is actually a good price for what you get). So I bought that and was ...


3

I do video with my Canon 5d Mkii. I am a beginner at video, but I have done photography for years. 1) How important is sharpness? My lenses are all about the same sharpness, and I've never A/B'ed two different lenses at the same focal length. In my experience, lens sharpness is at the bottom of the list of problems with a shot. Getting enough light, ...


3

The CineStyle picture style provides you with a flat, desaturated image: providing the best dynamic range of any of the picture styles for Canon DSLRs. Technicolor provide you with a file that you can apparently import into your editing software to help you grade your footage. However, I never figured out how to use it and frankly, I don't think one needs ...


2

The link on the video says they used magic lantern which is alternate firmware update that is open source for the t2i and other canon bodies. I can only say that canon will not support it, it can void your warrenty, and overheat and cause all sorts of shut down problems. Having said that, this is how they were able to adjust the shutter setting slower. I ...


2

Depending on how much you are looking to slow down. Interpret as 50fps, and then once in your timeline, say it is a 25fps timeline. Then you can stretch the footage using time remapping, then you can turn on frame blending to the solid line...this will be good in most instances up to about 25% speed of original... Less than that the same, 25fps timeline, ...


2

The usual tool recommended for this is JES Deinterlacer, which apparently has an adaptive method of finding and removing the 'smear' frames. I haven't used it myself. The reason this is an issue is that the field cadence used for PF24 is (stupidly, IMO) different from the typical telecine cadence, which is what most 'inverse telecine' algos detect and ...


2

You are correct. You're shooting at a much lower resolution on video than stills, and so your effective circles of confusion are much bigger. So you can get away with glass that a decent stills photographer wouldn't touch. This is speaking from experience at work where I share DSLR equipment with a bunch of stills photographers who are always complaining ...


2

In almost all digital video cameras there's no physical shutter, just a circuit that limits the exposure time. As long as that time allows the entire sensor to be illuminated and scanned, you should see no degradation of any individual frame. In this sense, as long as the minimum is met, there should be no visible difference between a fast shutter and an ND. ...


2

It is likely not possible to change in camera. For power and efficiency reasons, cameras generally use dedicated encoder hardware to encode the video in real time (this is why your camera can encode h.264 video live, but when you try to encode it on your PC, it takes longer, even though your computer is far FAR more powerful.) The caveat of this is that ...


2

You can probably do it directly through the EOS software. It is possible to get a live video stream from the camera over the USB connection. Note that USB2 is not going to be able to carry a full quality HDMI stream though. This is why the Intensity is USB3. It requires USB3 because the bandwidth requirements for the quality level it is working at ...


2

I disagree with the above answers. Our visual culture and the century of cinema has dictated that we evaluate a 180 degree shutter as "normal", because that is how film cameras have worked almost forever, and that is how most scenes in every movie are shot. 180 degree shutter is the same as 1 over twice the frame rate, or 1/48 for 24fps. If there is ...


2

You don't mention which Transcend card you bought but the benchmarks here indicate that the write throughput performance of Transcend cards are a little under 10 Mbps (naively I assume this is true for their brand of SD cards but I could be wrong). Strictly speaking the SD Card class rating seems to imply 10 Mbps minimum for 1080p recording so that may ...


1

Video files are relatively complex beasts that have multiple factors contributing to how well they play. First, a video file has a container format, this is generally indicated based on the extension the file has and simply defines how the file is physically organized. A MOV file is an Apple Quicktime file, an AVI is a windows audio/video file. Other ...


1

There's a number of things that can be the issue, and a number of ways to try to work around them. The first is that depending on the specs of your computer, it might not be able to decode the video files quickly enough, which could cause a stutter. Similar to how people used to have issues trying to watch 1080p videos on Netbooks that didn't have much ...


1

If Canon no longer has the part, most likely your best bet will be to find another used MV 750i that you can salvage the part from. If you have a repair manual, you might checking what the part number it lists is and try searching if any surplus places have the part itself. Some quick looking on eBay shows what appears (or at least claims) to be a ...


1

You can't do advanced manipulation like that in camera. In general, most DSLRs are limited to relatively simple or special stuff like limited HDR processing, simple B/W or basic cropping. Advanced editing like selective coloration require post production work and often require some matte painting to get it to work the way you want. It doesn't have to be ...


1

VirtualDub is a very powerful video editor. However, it's not very intuitive to use it and it has a steep learning curve. On the plus side, there's a large internet community that supports it, so lots of online resources are available. For your specific problem I've made a short tutorial below. I've done all steps in Windows XP with two .mov files from a ...


1

The Youtube Video Editor does the things you list. Here's a screenshot of the editor in action. As you can see you can adjust the color balance and the saturation and, not shown here, it is also possible to combine several clips into one. When you're done editing go to your Video Dashboard, click on the arrow next to Edit on your video and click ...


1

I don't think there is anything specifically made for use with a glidecam. My impression of most stabilization systems is that you still operate the camera directly, you just are not supporting it without the stabilization. I'm not aware of any follow focus/pull systems that are designed specifically for use with a gimble or gimble and spring-arm ...


1

You are seeing the scan line of the projector. You need a camera with a screen sync feature in order to deal with the rolling shutter issue and depending on the technique used by the projector, it may not even be possible. What you are actually seeing is what the projector actually does, it's just that it happens too fast for your eye to perceive it ...


1

The reasons for an automatic stop are either reaching the 30 minute limit (thank you European Union video camera tax that ends up impacting what's available to most of the rest of the world), hitting the 4gb file limit (file system limit for the OS on the camera), the sensor is overheating (high usage + temperature) or the buffer is being used up (memory ...


1

Well the best method quality wise is using The Foundrys "Kronos" ( http://www.thefoundry.co.uk/products/kronos/ ). Its a similar tool like twixtor but delivers the better results (in my opinion). If you dont want to use that/spend money then use twixtor OR the built-in time remapping functions, you get the best results by letting either one of them do its ...


1

No, if the lens is soft while shooting video you will notice. However when shooting any of the Canon Cameras, 5D mark three to be exact, the camera is very susceptible to sharpening in a proper grading software or VFX software, AE can do this, so can Nuke, Flame, Smoke, and many of your color grading softwares. So yes you will notice if the lens is soft in ...


1

Hey I know this is an old post, but I have been trying to figure this out definitively. My situation is thus. I am using a T2i, except I am trying to record from my projector, an inFocus IN104 (it was basically the cheapest I could afford at the time). I have tried a bunch of lenses (kit lens 18 - 55mm (3.5 - 5.6), Pentax 50mm (1.7), Pentax 135mm(3.5)) at ...



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