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7

Do you have a component out. An R/G/B or R/G/B/V/U feed should be stable over a 100 ft run as long as you can separate the components on different wires. We do this for the Excel and Break Out youth conferences with Youth For Christ and our runs are significantly longer than 100 feet. If you don't, you could probably get a reasonably cheap firewire to ...


5

What you are talking about is upscaling and any current HDTV will do upscaling automatically. Upscaling doesn't work miracles though, it will only make it so that the lower quality signal can be watched on a higher quality display. It just multiplies the pixels so that a 720 by 480 (.9 pixel compressed) signal for example doesn't end up only taking up 1/4 ...


4

No it does not mean you can do anything wirelessly - it is a cable - and it isn't likely to help you stream anything to it either, unless you have a requirement for HDMI devices to share a network connection. Version 1.4 of the HDMI standard allows for 100Mb ethernet to be transmitted along the cable between to HDMI 1.4 capable devices. Check out the HDMI ...


4

Not dangerous at all. You may have impedance matching issues though. And possibly lots of noise in the signal because of the unbalanced source and mis-matched impedance. Start with the volume on the Yamahas all the way down and, with something playing on the television, nudge the volume up ever so slightly until you can hear the source. You want to make ...


4

You can absolutely run composite video over RG-59 or RG-6 without any trouble up to a few hundred feet in my experience. (Analog style security cameras utilize composite connections and run hundreds of feet.) You could even use a video amp to extend further. Also consider that when you encode/compress the stream for broadcasting, you are essentially ...


4

As you have Wi-Fi access you could buy a Wi-Fi capable camera. For example the HP T450 costs $134 and is able to stream to Ustream via Wi-Fi. The pages 39-42 of the manual (PDF) elaborate on the use of Wi-Fi to stream to Ustream. This is just one of many Wi-Fi capable camera's. Sony's Bloggie ($150) can also stream over Wi-Fi, but it uses Qik as its footage ...


4

The cabling is likely your problem. The composite cables you're using (red, yellow, white) will only move analog signal from the set top box to the TV. Likewise with RG59 or RG6 (coaxial). While both varieties of cables there are technically capable of passing digital signals (they don't care... they're just dumb cables), set top boxes typically only ...


4

Unfortunately there is no perfect or exact answer. Your question topic mentions HD-SDI, which is a digital signal. Those tends to degrade 'cliff-wise', unlike analog signals where degradation is gradual. It will partly depend on the quality of the receiving device -- whether or not, or how well, it can capture the signal as the eye pattern turns to mush. ...


3

Convert the signal coming out of the camera to SDI and run a long SDI cable (it's designed for long runs - it's what they use in TV studios and outside broadcasts) into an SDI capture card on the computer which will let you do whatever you want with it. Blackmagic sell all the gear you need: Get a Decklink card and a HDMI to SDI mini converter and that will ...


3

Yellow and white generally mean video (yellow) and mono audio or left channel audio (white). It is fairly typical for a usb like port to be used as a video connector when the proper cable is inserted. It sometimes even uses the same exact port. Note that it requires special hardware in the camera. You can't simply plug it into any USB port and expect ...


3

A long VGA cable with a proper amp/spliter on the TX side, would be the simplest option. You can get good VGA cables up to 150' at modest prices from http://www.pccables.com . Another good option is a CAT5 extender kit. http://milestek.com/p-16209-vga-over-cat5ecat6-decora-wall-plate-set.aspx Without a more detailed description of what you are trying to ...


3

When I was a a corporate photo/video shooter I found the "desk and office cleaner" everyone had worked pretty well with paper towels. Now that I shoot in the third world, it is Lysol wipes when i get back to the studio. And it is terrifying how many it takes until they come out clean...


3

For delicate cables use dish washing soap and warm water with a clean rag. Do not tug or squeeze on the cable too hard and be extra gentle with anything that has twisted pair. For not so delicate cables rubbing alcohol on a clean rag then applied should do the trick.


2

I don't know of any cables which do it, but you have a simpler solution: A few recent HDMI computer monitors will be able to do this in hardware - an example I quite like is the The Samsung Syncmaster C24A650X


1

You didn't specify keyboard, but sometimes it can be useful to switch USB along with the VGA signal. For this you'd want a KVM.


1

VGA is RGBHV (horizontal and vertical sync) not YPbPr so without active adapting hardware, it isn't going to work. The formats are not compatible as the addressing information is missing. You might be able to find a dual mode monitor that has support for both formats on the connector (some video mixers do for example), but it would be luck of the draw ...


1

Goo Gone. Put it on a cloth, rub it on the sticky part of the cable. Let it sit for a minute, then rub off with a dry cloth. Repeat if necessary. For this or any of the other suggested procedures, it would be a good idea to test on a small non-critical part of the cable. I've never had a problem with it though.


1

I'm assuming you're talking about digital cable, since it's 2012. The way this works is that your equipment tunes into a frequency over which a multiplex is broadcast. That's a digital stream that can be demultiplexed into a number of sub-streams. Each sub-stream is a TV channel. There are standards for these things. The sensible thing to do (especially ...



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