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Professional film productions use neither only green nor only blue for chroma keying, but switch between both depending on the scene. Each can only be used when there are no objects of the same colour in view, otherwise it takes extra work to un-remove these objects. Blue and green are the usual colours because the human skin, which is what will almost ...


6

From this green/blue screen guide: "Green chroma screens have become more and more popular in recent years, largely because green provides a brighter color channel that tends to have less noise than the blue channel. The relative brightness of green makes it a bad choice for shooting blonde hair though, which is a lot easier to key against blue ...


4

Jonas Hummelstrand has a great guide over on his blog - General Specialist that details out a bunch of tips for it (including descriptions and pictures), I'd recommend checking that out. Ultimately the #1 key is lighting - you have to maintain a smooth and consistent lighting job on the backdrop so that the camera "sees" a consistent blue/green free from ...


2

The Lord of the Rings used green screen. That's the last behind the scenes I've seen, however I can't imagine it being 'most' if that's the case. Looking at the wiki article there are a couple that use blue but if you think about it I imagine it all comes down to what the actor is wearing and if there are any sets pieces involved. Green may be best for ...


1

Looking at "behind the scenes" videos from Game of Thrones, it uses both colors in turns. So yes, both work, you just pick the one that works in the situation you are filming in at that point.



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