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4

What is your definition of huge and what is your definition of high quality? Size is directly related to compression and compression is directly inversely related to quality for the most part. Some amount of compression can be had for free using lossless compression or near free with more efficient pattern finding for lossy compression, but for the most ...


3

The usual tool recommended for this is JES Deinterlacer, which apparently has an adaptive method of finding and removing the 'smear' frames. I haven't used it myself. The reason this is an issue is that the field cadence used for PF24 is (stupidly, IMO) different from the typical telecine cadence, which is what most 'inverse telecine' algos detect and ...


3

I assume the actual data rate is 3.3 Mb/s, not MB/s (bits, not bytes). This is very low for 1080p60, and artifacts are likely at such a low rate. You might consider capturing at at least double that rate. Alternatively (or also), halving the frame rate to 29.97 would double the effective bit rate. You would be trading some motion artifacting for less ...


3

Wonderful ffmpeg command line utility is the solution. Just check their documentation, but something like the following will probably work for your case: ffmpeg -i video.mts video%05d.png This will take your video, and create video00001.png, video00002.png... files in the same folder. You can find a lot of guides for ffmpeg, or ask here for a specific ...


2

Video is practically never stored uncompressed because the data rates are insane if they were. Each image in a video is 1920 by 1080 pixels and takes 3 bytes per pixel (one each for red, green and blue). That's 6.2 megabytes per frame. There are 24 frames in a second, that's roughly 150 megabytes per second for 24p video. That's 9 gigabytes per minute. ...


2

It sounds like there is a problem with your Dolby Decoder for the AC3 audio stream. If you are on a trial or pirated copy then you may not have been able to activate the AC3 decoder that normally comes with Premiere. (Adobe has to pay Dolby for each copy used.) If you are on a legit copy, something may have become corrupt with the Dolby decoder. Try doing ...


2

When you ask how something will 'look' you're in the realm of the subjective. Things 'look' different to experienced professionals than they might to the average viewer. But still, the 1080p video will not be as good no matter what you view it on. When you encode at a low bit rate you aren't removing pixels, you're mostly removing high frequencies. Doing ...


2

There is no way around needing more data rate to capture that much video information. It sounds like the camera probably isn't actually capable of delivering 1080P/60 but that they use a very low quality version so they can slap the label on the box. Data rates are generally measured in Mb(bits)/sec rather than MB/s, but even if your suggested rate ...


2

Seeing that in the text of your question you have started discussing other utilities, i will assume that you are not interested in sticking with ffmpeg, but rather in getting the job done. In my experience with libav and MTS i have had no problems with the framerate, the files get remuxed perfectly. I have just attempted the following with one of my files: ...


1

You might want to try to enforce the original frame rate by using -r 29.97. FFmpeg is probably trying to adjust the framerate for some reason. Your syntax is otherwise correct and shouldn't produce that error. Regarding your third question. Simply not possible. You can omit frames when using codecs that encode frames individually but thats not the case with ...


1

As AJ Henderson already said you can not use the Dolby codec in a trial version of Premiere due to licensing costs on Adobe's side. What you can do to circumvent this is trancode the audio with a different tool like FFmpeg. With ffmpeg you can use this command below to transcode the audio to PCM but leave the video untouched. I chose avi for the container ...


1

Did some quick research on the Internet and found this: File extension CPI is AVCHD Video Clip Information File. The AVCHD directory contains a folder for clipinfo which contains one .cpi file for each .mts file in the stream folder. cpi (clip info) contains various contains metadata describing an AVCHD video stream, such as the frame rate, ...


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Quite an expensive solution: Sony Vegas Pro + Transcoder plugin can do it :)


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You can achieve all your goals using ffmpeg and sox, these are command line tools for video and audio processing respectively. I can not provide you with a ready to roll solution, but here are examples for a pre-roll video, audio noise reduction, text overlay and conversion from AVCHD.


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Use ClipWrap to convert the MTS file into a Quicktime Movie file (e.g. ProRes 422 codec). There's a free version and a paid version - both will do what you need: http://www.divergentmedia.com/clipwrap Handbrake will also do this, I believe: http://allmybrain.com/2010/01/05/handbrake-can-convert-mts-files-for-mac/


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Here you go, here is a list of applications on PC and MAC that open MTS files and can convert them to a more desirable file format. http://www.fileinfo.com/extension/mts



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