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5

There are a variety of reasons to have an external recorder depending on the size of your production. A big advantage is the number of audio inputs and the ability to record each of those inputs as separate tracks, allowing you to do the mixing in post. I'm not sure about the H4n, but I know the H5 and H6 support multiple inputs as well as interchangeable ...


4

Yes, its way better. Being able to monitor the levels, and headphones, makes a huge difference. However, its not even just the quality of the mic or recording device its the location. Having an external recorder means you can separate the audio easily from the camera. Back in the day when I was a teen, and had more enthusiasm than money, we used mics from ...


4

Can't speak for the Nikon, but the Canon 5D and 7D both have terrible on-board audio, with no way to easily monitor the audio levels. The Zoom will have a better mic pre-amp, and will let you monitor the levels easily and accurately. You can also monitor the audio on headphones whilst filming, so you'll stand a better chance of spotting problems, like wind ...


4

File format Bit rate tells surprisingly little about quality in the case of mp3 files. There are old encoders where no matter how low you set the compression, there will always be audible artifacts. But LAME and the like have long gotten over this, and properly done 320 kBit mp3 is for listening purposes lossless, just like CDs are. Note anyway that mp3 is ...


2

What you want is generally called an "HDMI audio extractor". There are several hardware products on the market that will extract the audio in the HDMI stream to an audio out connection and pass-through the video part. A search on ebay gives you several results: http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=HDMI+audio+extractor Though if you need very high quality ...


2

Complexity is the main thing. Because of how audio works, there tends to not be a whole lot of variation in the quality you get from a given bit rate. While video often has frames that are very similar from one image to another, audio rarely has the exact same sound playing for a long period of time. This lack of predictability in audio means that the ...


2

It's also known as having an solid understanding of microphones and recording techniques, as well as sound audio editing principles. These types of videos are a great example of how awesome sound recording can enhance picture, and examples of the reason no filmmaker should skimp on sound. It's easier to mess up good sound for dramatic effect (say, adding EQ ...


2

A standard for WAV is 48K / 16 bit mono, or stereo if there's ambiance or presence you'd like to preserve. The last two parameters are a consequence of those choices and you can calculate them based on your selection. Then any compression you might apply afterward will have a good starting basis. If all you're after is intelligibility, a lower sample rate ...


2

Apart from the other benefits mentioned - mic placement, quality of the pre-amps, ability to properly monitor levels, another advantage is that many of the good quality digital recorders (like the Zooms) will let you record 24 bit samples at up to 96kHz. To use a not completely accurate analogy, that's like recording raw video at 4K instead of 8-bit at ...


2

I wouldn't recommend the h4n anymore. It is still a huge step up from the on-board audio, but it generally isn't the best value anymore. The H5n or H6n are both better options available now and generally better value unless you are getting a used H4n that someone is selling so they can buy the 5n or 6n. That said, yes, you want an external audio recorder. ...


2

Getting the audio recording separated from the video recording is one of the best things you can do to improve your sound. What makes good camera placement doesn't always make for good audio placement. Also, your audio recorder can keep running while your camera isn't, so you don't miss anything. That being said however, the zoom h4n has some mediocre ...


2

There's no single answer - it's a series of trade-offs: When you record your voice, it should be as loud as possible, but making sure never to go over the maximum level that can be recorded. This is known as clipping, and sounds distorted. Too quiet, and your audio will be hissy relative to the noise floor of your setup - too loud and it will clip. In ...


1

Get a better computer. The fact that the audio sounds fine in other apps means it was recorded fine, and the file represents the audio correctly. When you open it in your editor though, that's a much more complex operation than simply playing the video in an optimized player. So, I think this is a performance issue. I've had this problem myself with cheaper ...


1

Audacity has a compressor effect, however I found the "Compress dynamics" VST plugin generating better results, see more here. If you want better control over the compression parameters you should try SoX. Another approach is to try the Vocal Remover VST plugin for Audacity (it is in the same package as Compress dynamics), and if it succeeds in removing the ...


1

I'm not sure if Audacity has this, but what you need is a compressor (actually an expander, but they're opposite things built into a tool referred to as a compressor). The compressor allows you to limit sound that is above a certain dB level, the expander limits sound under that level, called a gate. You can set a gate with the compressor at a sound level, ...


1

What you can always do is intercept the signal before it goes into the camera. Buy a small mixer, plug the mic into it and use the headphone out of the mixer to monitor the mic. Then take the master stereo out of the mixer and run it into your camera. You should get on the camera what you hear on the phones. You may want one of the HDMI audio extractors to ...


1

Its most likely your sound card. HP is notorious for using extremely cheap components on non essential hardware, such as your soundcard. It is the same way with all 3 of my HP computers.


1

Try seperating the audio and video streams of the WMV and AVI files - I don't have an app in mind but there should be some free ones avaliable. Put the video part in, which will remain in the original format (WMV or AVI) and should work. For the audio, use Soundbooth to convert it into a variety of formats like WAV, MP3, WMV, etc. until the import works ...



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