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1

Since your source is in h264 I'm guessing you are encoding to mp4/h264 again? The format doesn't support a frame rate of 99, you will have to use a less constrained video codec like mjpeg in an avi or mov container. Whenever you are violating certain video or audio specs After Effects will tell you that in your export settings like shown here (see the ...


1

Practically you can't do this. The best you can probably do is make it more shaky and grainy. You could also drop the resolution to make it look like it had been digitally zoomed in. The reason you can't practically do it is because of perspective. When you shoot video from close up, the angle of view is much closer. A small difference in distance to ...


4

When you shoot from further away you use a "longer" lens, in other words a lens with a longer focal length. This has a few effects, that you'll have to fake to make it look real. First, the perspective tends to get flattened with long lenses. You've probably seen this in the classic cinema trope of a long shot of a crowd walking along a footpath, where ...


3

Unless you need it make sure you are using the Classic 3D rendering mode and not the "Ray-Traced 3D" renderer. You can see and change the renderer in the top right corner of your comp view or just go into the composition settings menu through the top menu bar. If you are in need of using the RayTraced 3D renderer click on the options menu and increase the ...


1

If I understand what your asking correctly there is a way of doing it. On the subcomp layer in the main comp add a colour expression control effect (Effects > Expression Controls > Color, then control it with an expression so that it's linked to the colour of the colour picker (use the pick whip). Now in the subcomp itself the colour will be available to ...


2

This is most likely a practical effect accomplished with a photographic flash. It would just have to be fired on the action at the appropriate time. Photographic flashes are extremely fast firing and completely discharge in a very small fraction of a second. Since exposure is a cumulative effect, the majority of the exposure can be accomplished in a ...


2

I do not know of and couldn't find a script that does this already but it would be certainly possible to write one. After Effects doesn't have a functionality built-in for that. With the help of ExtendScript you can write very powerful extensions for After Effects and its very easy to get going with it. Just open up the "Adobe ExtenScript Toolkit" that gets ...


2

Oddly enough, this has to be done in the composition window itself. In the top left-hand corner of your timeline window, you know the little orange numbers that tell you the current timecode? If you CMD + click on that (ctrl + click on windows), it'll switch to Frames instead of timecode. When you hit CMD + K to bring up the composition settings again, ...


-1

This is most likely not a practical effect. In order to achieve this effect practically, one would need a light that is sync'd to the frame rate of the camera to turn on for 1/24 (depending on the framerate) of a second. It sounds...impractical (word jokes!). You can easily isolate a frame in After Effects by converting you time line to frame rate time ...


1

There is a script called "rd_RenderLayers" from redefinery, maybe thats what you mean. It does exactly that, adding every layer to your render queue. Unfortunately his website is on hiatus but the downloads still work, you can download the latest version here.


0

The general way to do this now is to use nested compositions and export each composition separately.


1

You can link properties in different compositions by using an expression like this one. comp("Comp Name").layer("Layer Name")("Property e.g. Transform")("SubProperty e.g. Position") If the property is more nested you just add another ("sub property") until you reach the property you need, just as you would click through the drop down menus. Also helpful: ...


1

Windows Server is very much the same as the Desktop Windows regarding the core of the OS, there is just some stuff missing and other stuff added that is usefull for webservers. You shouldn't have any problems installing an After Effects render node, I used Windows Server 2008 R2 myself for an After Effects CS5 network render node. Shouldn't have changed ...


3

I needed a similar animation recently and I gave up on creating the entire animation from scratch. This is what I did instead - I used a green screen and captured my hand doing the animation on video. For this purpose, it doesn't need to be a production quality green screen setup, I just used a green cloth on a table, a camera on a tripod from above and few ...


2

So, the answer to your question is 'yes, but...' It's perfectly feasible, but you have to create an output module with the settings that you want, and then save it to your computer. You can create this by going to Edit -> Templates -> Output Module. Click on the 'New' button in the pop-up window, and then Edit it for the settings you need (quicktime, ...


3

You can do it without the added complexity of precomposing. Look in the File> Scripts> menu, there's a script there called scale Composition.jsx. Run it, type in the new width, height or percentage and hit the button. Done. Scripts are a useful, but rather neglected part of the AE tool set.


3

You can scale down everything in your composition by pre-comping everything and then shrinking the size of that pre-comp. I'm not entirely sure what you mean by "when I adjust the comp size the footage stays the same". If you mean that when you change the composition size, the footage extends beyond the new border of the comp, then pre-comping and scaling ...


0

1) In addition to the meta-data panel that Gin-San mentions, you can also right click on a clip in the project explorer and hit properties to get details about the file, which I believe includes the frame rate. 2) The new sequence settings are the settings that match your input video. So if the video is a 60fps video, it will end up making the output of ...


0

To answer your Questions in order: You can see the framerate of a clip or sequence by navigating to the metadata panel. It's usually one of the tabs in the upper left on the standard layout. If you don't see it, select Window -> Metadata. Generally, you should set sequences to match you source material. So if your camera records 720p @ 60 fps, stick to ...



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