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5

Disk space. The 3d content takes more space so there is generally not enough room for special features. The 2d special features are only on the 2d disk. They take up the room that the second eye takes on the 3d disk. They could make a special features only disk, but this is generally more expensive since it requires another master and another production ...


5

Production Software Used: PfTrack, PfMatchit, Boujou, Syntheyes, Nuke Camera Tracker... Student free use: Autodesk Matchmover All of the above software is used to 3D Match Move Cameras to video sequences. Most of them are very expensive. PfTrack is my personal favorite. Although all of the above mentioned software is used to solve cameras for video ...


5

Simply put, to make a full length movie requires a lot of man hours and generally a decent budget. It becomes more cost effective to get real animation software when dealing with a full length film than trying to struggle through with something like Blender. Don't get me wrong, Blender is great for what it is as a free product, but, at least as of the last ...


4

There are two different approaches that can be used. Motion/Camera tracking and Motion Control. In Motion or Camera tracking, multiple non-coplanar fixed points in the scene are tracked and from that it is possible to extrapolate the position of the camera within the scene. This information can then be fed into a virtual camera used to generate the output ...


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to accomplish this, we need to cheat something. I assume you are trying to do something like this in the following image: First, create a camera in your comp (i see you already have one) Then create a text layer and make it 3D (you have this as well) Select your layer and select Ellipse tool (Q) but do not apply anything. While your text layer selected, ...


3

Unless you need it make sure you are using the Classic 3D rendering mode and not the "Ray-Traced 3D" renderer. You can see and change the renderer in the top right corner of your comp view or just go into the composition settings menu through the top menu bar. If you are in need of using the RayTraced 3D renderer click on the options menu and increase the ...


3

Sometimes yes, sometimes no. If it is shot "for 3d" then yes, they use either two cameras or a splitter to go through two optical assemblies to one camera. Here are some sample rigs that have actually been used in large films. There are, however, a number of films that are released in 3d despite having not been shot "for 3d". In these cases, the films ...


3

This depends entirely on what kind of 3d video you want. There are numerous formats for 3d video. Some are as simple as placing the left and right images either side by side or one on top of the other (typically compressing them spatially to still take up the original space, for example 1080p video done like this ends up being wither 540 vertical pixels ...


2

When you render in 3D Max make sure pre-multiplying is turned off. Given the situation you want to render an object to be used for post-production within Photoshop, then… Be sure you set the background to complete black: Rendering > Environment > Background > Colour (click on the colour field and set red, green and blue to 0) Set the ...


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This can either be an issue with OpenGL and you may want to disable it in the program settings (under "File) to test if thats the issue. Or you may have disabled the standard infinite light that is present in every new scene until you add your first light. Add an infinite light from the lights menu and see if that gives your objects some shading. Also try ...


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There actually are two films that I am aware of. One is 'Naught 5' and Plumiferos. You can easily Google to see the production websites.


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For creating a 3d image (from two jpeg images), this piece of software works pretty well: http://stereo.jpn.org/eng/stphmkr/ Creating a full 3d video is a bit more difficult, so I'm not sure if I can help you there.


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There seem to be a few basic misconceptions here. For cartoons you don't need anything fancy as long as cell-shading is supported, which is typically a camera filter. Lighting is actually done in your 3d animation software. The job of a render engine like Mental Ray or V-ray is simply to process the scene you build to generate the final image, but it ...


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Select your camera, locators (if exported), and anything else from Nuke. Group them all together with ctrl+g and modify that group as a whole. You can scale uniformly (but not independent axes), rotate, and translate. Often one trick is to snap the pivot point of the group to a specific reference point (hold down d and v then drag to the reference point, ...


2

It depends what you regard as "true 3d" but there is a technique called "Light Field Display" which has been in development for some time now. Its essentially still a 2D screen but you can walk around and look at it from different angle as if it were an actual 3d object. http://gl.ict.usc.edu/Research/3DDisplay/


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Not at a usable frame rate. The fastest I'm aware of is one that updates every 2 seconds. They are also not free floating in air, but rather projected within a block of material. There is a nice article on discovery.com about the most advanced one I know of here. There are also vapor displays that can display a video floating in space, but those aren't ...


1

There are many ways this can be done. Historically, the main way was to paint the area of each surface and then create a texture map in the 3d software that would take the portions of the image and project them on to the geometry. You simply had to know the shapes of your surfaces. (Sometimes the software could even output a template to fill in, but it ...


1

GoPro Hero's are frequently used in the kind of capacity you describe. It is possible you got some defective units (as certainly the time lapse stuff for the silver is a bad unit), however much of the problems appear to be user error rather than camera problems. In your overlay shots, the frame appears to be consistent, they just aren't pointed in the same ...


1

This still isn't as easy as it should be, but the way forward is to export your geometry as Alembic. It supports many textured objects, and even animated sequences. Depending on your version of Maya, you may need to install a plugin, but it is much better than dealing with OBJ and FBX as the interchange format in most cases.


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When you bake an object in C4D you get several options which passes you want to be applied in the final baked texture. You might want to try to generate new UV's by not ticking the "keep UVs" setting. If you want to bake lightning you have to tick the luminance pass for that. Also be aware that the baked object might look horrible in the viewport but will ...


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You can work around it using multiple compositions. Do one composition to generate the 3d layer and then use that composition within another to handle the blending (or vice versa depending on your needs).


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If you want to use a physics simulation, your best bet is to have a collision but don't render the object that collides. I haven't used 3DSMax personally in a number of years, but there should be an option to have the object physically impact the scene but not be rendered by the render engine itself. Then you simply do the collision to occur at frame 450 ...


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This is a tricky video production technique. Anyway, try the following steps: First, create 4 black solid layers. Then, add a Lens Flare to them. Place one flare in the bottom right corner. On another solid, make the lens flare on the fare right middle. For the third color solid's lens flare, make it on the top. With different color flares, it will ...


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CG is probably the best bet. Motion controlled cameras would be the second best bet, but it would still be pretty tricky as the real world has a remarkable ability to change subtly, but substantially enough to result in a jump cut pretty quickly. Even if you could manage to stop the camera on something that is static, resuming the movement at the same ...


1

It depends on the quality you want to achieve and where your skill set is. The bigger difference between 2d and 3d animation isn't so much the time it consumes, but rather the skill set it requires. The techniques for both are completely different (though there is a subset of 2d animation that is based on cell-shading or other specialized rendering of 3d ...


1

There may be software to look at a photo and determine the lens, lens height, and lens angle. But I only know of software that does this with video clips. However the way to do would be to look at the shot and overlay the photo with the scene, and play with 3D cameras lens, lens height, and lens angle and get it close. Due to lens distortion there is some ...



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