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I am attempting to edit video in Adobe Premiere CS6. When I create a sequence and try to play it back in the preview screen, the video is extremely choppy, which makes editing very difficult (dance videos, i.e. trying to sync with music properly).

After some searching, two things seem to work for others - either changing playback quality to 1/4 or 1/2, or rendering the work area before playback. The former seems to have no effect, although the latter (rendering) does create smooth video.

Unfortunately, when the render finishes, the video is now playing in super slow motion, and is therefore completely out of sync with the music. Any ideas on how to fix this?

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Does the audio play back smoothly before you render? If the source video is being interpolated incorrectly (say 2.4 FPS instead of 24 or something similar) then it would preview as very "jumpy" since it was only changing frames every 10 frames, but the audio could still play back correctly in certain formats. The rendering could interpolate the intermediate frames and make things appear more smoothly, but would appear very slow. Even if this isn't the case, something very odd is clearly going on with your project which may make it hard to diagnose remotely (but I can give it a try.) –  AJ Henderson Jun 17 '13 at 14:28
    
I tested it on another computer (powerful desktop, as opposed to my laptop) today, and confirmed. audio and video are fine beforehand - slow and choppy on my computer, but good enough on the desktop to edit the video. when I select a work area and try to render it, audio remains fine, and video slows down. i.e. if I select 30 seconds of video to render, the result is 30 secs of audio and about 20 secs of video stretched to fill 30 sec in slomo. if its pertinent, my raw files are 1440x1080, 59.96 fps. I've never worked with anything past basics before, so I may have made beginner's mistakes. –  scallionpancake Jun 17 '13 at 21:38
    
ok, well that's a very weird resolution and very high frame rate. It isn't all that surprising that it is causing problems with playback on a lower end system since the data rate is probably far too high for the hard disks to keep up with and may well be too much for the CPU to keep up with as well. As for the slow down, it may be a problem with how the footage is being interpreted. Have you tried rendering the project on your desktop to see if you have the same slowdown problem? –  AJ Henderson Jun 17 '13 at 23:57
    
yeah, its very high (wish i could've chosen the camera!). it is too taxing for my laptop, which is why i tried a desktop today - the same problem is there. i may be importing (and subsequently exporting) the videos with bad settings, i think. as a side note, the video preview without rendering is smooth enough on the desktop for me to edit, but i can't seem to find the right export settings (smooth, but artifacts in the video) - im searching for common solutions to that, but it may be related. –  scallionpancake Jun 18 '13 at 1:18
    
You may have accidentally unlinked your video from your audio and stretched the footage. If you rendered it for a preview and it plays choppy then that is your computer unable to keep up. If you rendered it as a preview and it plays in slow motion and is actually stretched out longer than it actually is then you probably accidentally stretched it somehow. It's easy enough to do with the Rate Stretch Tool (R). –  deecemobile Aug 19 '13 at 12:51
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1 Answer 1

It sounds like a combination of two things from the comments discussion. First, with the very high frame rate, your laptop simply can not handle the high data rate. If you need to edit on the laptop, I would suggest re-compressing the video down to a smaller size and then when you are done, you can replace the low quality footage with the original for the final output.

The second problem is that it appears Premiere is interpreting the footage wrong. There is an Interpret Footage option if you right click on the clip and go to Modify, Interpret Footage. You can confirm the frame rate is correct on the source. If it is, then you also want to check the framerate on the sequence itself. Right click on the sequence, choose Sequence Settings and verify that the frame rate is correct there as well. If both of those are correct and you are still getting the issues, then I am unsure what could be happening.

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