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Is there a way to apply the same effects across multiple video tracks?

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I don't have Vegas, but have you tried copying and pasting the effect if it is possible to select it? I know this works in several other similar products. –  AJ Henderson Jun 15 '13 at 14:27
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2 Answers

U P D A T E:

I have located a script that suggests it can "apply the same effects across multiple video tracks" here:

http://mmdv.com/vegastips/index.php?title=Scripts

Under "Beginners Scripts" is this one:

AddEffectToAllMedia demonstrates how you can add an effect to all media files in the project.

You will need to download "Media:Beginner Scripts.zip" and unzip then install this script in Vegas as shown here:

http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/scripting_in_vegas_pro_and_sound_forge

(Scripting became available with Vegas Pro 4)

-------------------- old but may have some other value --------------------- I have considerable experience with Vegas Pro and generally there is no button to push that will apply the same effect to multiple clips. I generally apply effects individually to each clip and move on to the next one. But here's something you might like to know. If for instance you apply an effect and you change its default values as in tweak it a bit you can save this new effect by the following.

Assuming I had a special blend of brightness and contrast, I would type in a new unique name, lets say "brightness -10, contrast +25" and then hit the save button next to the line, this button looks like the standard save icon (an old floppy). You won't see this effect show up in this effects group until you navigate to another effects group and then come back to it (a manual refresh if you will). This way you can at least apply the same effect without tweaking it each time over multiple clips.

Finally if you are good at scripting you might investigate if there is a script available to apply an effect to multiple clips by addressing this to the sony vegas forum at creative cow.

I generally don't want to apply all the same effects to each clip as each clip may need a tweak one way or another as I need to pay attention to all the effect details.

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Say, you have a video that has indoor and outdoor scenes, and also some other tracks. And you notice that indoor parts require brightness/saturation adjustment.

You cut your video into a sequence of scenes (Video Events), and you find it boring to apply FX to all/several indoor events, especially if they are cut into many places across your video.

I use a pretty simple technique to automate it.

  1. Make sure all Video Events that need to have an FX stay on a separate Video Track, so that the track contains only events that do need the FX. Call it, say, "Indoor with brightness".
  2. Let's complicate things and assume you also need some scenes to be pixelated. Place them into yet another track, call it "Indoor with brightness and pixelate". Apply Pixelate FX to this track.
  3. Make a new Video Track, and call it, say, "Brightness FX Master"
  4. Make both "Indoor with brightness" and "Indoor with brightness and pixelate" tracks to be children of "Brightness FX Master" track
  5. Apply the Brightness FX to "Brightness FX Master" track

enter image description here

Pros: You set all FX only once. Modify it freely and you don't need to re-apply it.

Cons: Usually, you will have to cut through the tracks carefully because it's impossible to add a non-FX track in between two child tracks. Also, managing cross-track crossfades is often a difficult to accomplish.

Also, You can't partially apply an FX this way, e.g., Brightness +10 is always Brightness +10, there's no way to set its opacity=50% (effectively to Brightness +5). In this case, use Animate feature to dynamically change parameters of applied FX ("Brightness Amount", in this case).

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