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Hope this is on-topic.

It is often that assesing the amount of work required for editting a video is a very hard task. This makes the payment issue a bit complicated.

I assume there is no one standart for this, but still, is there a recommended, customary payment system that helps making the deal fair for both parties?

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While it's probably more common to find freelance editors, it is possible to find salaried work as an editor. In such a case, you're not getting paid by the job, or by the hour. You negotiate an annual salary with your employer, agree on the terms of your employment, and do your best to field whatever they can throw at you. –  Jason Conrad Jul 6 at 4:14
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3 Answers 3

My experience is that it really depends on the situation and the editor. I personally have done both hourly and project rate editing. Typically I'll only take project rates if it is clear how much time it will take (ie, a simpler project), but it will really depend on your area and what particular editor you are working with.

I'd suggest having estimates of what you are willing to pay for either option and then simply ask them which method they prefer and then supply them with that number. If you have a preference one way or the other, you might also ask them if they would consider the method you prefer.

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The price what you as a videographer can ask per hour depends on a supply demand market. You could ask at least more then the minimum wage.

This is how I calculate price per hour.

equipment_costs = total_value_of_used_equipment/((8736/10)/3) 
price_per_hour = (minimum_wage_per_hour + workexperience_in_years) + equipment_costs

8763 is the total hours in one year
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Great point about making sure you factor in your costs when considering a rate. If you have better equipment (and know how to use it sufficiently well) then it makes the service more valuable. –  AJ Henderson Jul 4 at 17:10
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I can't give you guidance on pay rates - that depends on experience, your local market, and probably other factors.

I've had video editors on staff that were paid a full-time salary. When I was helping to interview a new team member, most of the candidates were doing contract work on an hourly basis. So it seems clear to me that payment for video editing can be as variable as any other job.

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