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I am making some video slide presentations (~15-30 minutes) which consists of a lot of animated slides and my voice. I made a test video to see where problems occur when doing such a project. It was a really hard work as I had to sync my video with my prerecorded voice.

How did I do it: I used Apple Keynote to make the presentation, exported it as a video with fixed animated timing, recorded my voice into an audio file, synced the material in Apple Final Cut Pro with manually pausing the video where it would get out of sync with the voice over.

Do you have any instructional sources on doing such a project in a more efficient manner with Mac OS X or have useful experience which you could share with me on this topic?

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Did this answer your question? If so, please mark as answered so other are able to refer to it. –  Zettt Apr 28 '12 at 22:26
    
"Do you have any instructional sources on doing such a project in a more efficient manner with Mac OS X or have useful experience which you could share with me on this topic?" <- No it didn't –  elhombre Apr 29 '12 at 18:56
    
So you didn't check out what @DoktorHauser mentioned? I'm wondering what part of the provided answers didn't answer your question. Because using one of the tools he mentioned would actually solve your problem. I guess it's not helping though. I post an answer in the main thread to hopefully help you. –  Zettt May 1 '12 at 21:21
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4 Answers

Using one of these solutions will be more efficient. That's what you've asked for. It saves you time, because there's no more need to manually sync the presentation and the voiceover.

Free Solution

  • Keynote can record a running presentation with the mic-audio.
  • QuickTime X has also a screenrecord-feature incl. audio.

Low Cost Solution

Pro Solution

A professional solution with capture hardware can record directly in Final Cut Pro X (and other NLE) native codecs/formats like ProRes422. This saves a lot of time and discspace. The picture and the audio will be always in sync, and in addition you'll get a recording with smtpe-conform timecode. – There are even more advantages, but they will be more important if you record live presentations.

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I worked for several years with dedicated screenrecording software to record live presentations. I've tested a lot of them and there is a lot unreliable software out there. Today i use capture hardware. –  DoktorHauser May 14 '12 at 16:19
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As @DoktorHauser mentioned. Using one of the tools he mentioned would actually solve your problem.

I don't really understand why you recorded your voice separately, if the point was to bring the video together with the audio. In that case it would have been much easier to record the audio with the video. (ScreenFlow, Camtasia and any of the tools mentioned are able to record audio from separate audio sources.)

If this didn't answer your question, we simply need more information. Your setup looks overly complicated.

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Yes, my setup is very complicated. I have slides with a lot of animations in it (moving objects, text change, dissolving numbers etc.) and a written voice over script which have to sync without errors or pauses as this would make my video to long. The problem I face is that having to speak a text which is ~15-30 min long and at the same time activating the next animation in the right moment is very difficult. I already did that and the recording was medium quality, which I can't publish according to my test audience. Does this clarify enough? Else don't hesitate to ask further questions. –  elhombre May 8 '12 at 14:00
    
As to DoktorHauser's answer. He didn't give me an instructional resource on how to do such a project in a efficient manner or shared his own experience on how to do such project. He gave me a software and hardware list. For a software list I can go to software.informer.com or even better to mac.appstorm.net/category/reviews/video/ which at least host reviews and comparisons on video editing software. I read his list and know most software a little bit. What puzzles me is why would I use a Ninja Atomos or HyperDeck Shuttle which from my point of view have nothing to do with desktop recording? –  elhombre May 8 '12 at 14:26
    
@elhombre wrote: "The problem I face is that having to speak a text which is ~15-30 min long and at the same time activating the next animation in the right moment is very difficult." - Thats not a technical problem with the recording, the software or whatever. You simply have to train that. Or find someone who can assist you. –  DoktorHauser May 14 '12 at 16:10
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@elhombre wrote: "What puzzles me is why would I use a Ninja Atomos or HyperDeck Shuttle which from my point of view have nothing to do with desktop recording?" - You can use this capture hardware for screen recording. The hardware records directly in Final Cut Pro X (and other NLE) native codecs/formats like ProRes422. This saves a lot of time and discspace. The picture and the audio will be always in sync, and in addition you'll get a recording with smtpe-conform timecode. –  DoktorHauser May 14 '12 at 16:15
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Here is what I believe may help you a litte better. This I found after seeing all these, good suggestions, but not answers to your question, from Gavin Minnis over on a apple support forum.

This is my recommendation.

Step 1) Create your Keynote presentation.

Step 2) Record your speaking part (separately) with an audio recording program.

I recommend Audacity. It's a great free application. You can download Audacity from www.sorceforge.com among other places. You'll also want to get the Audacity LIB file that is needed to export your audio recording to .mp3.

3) From the Keynote Inspector, under the Document tab, go to the audio section and add your new voice recording file to the Soundtrack.

4) From Keynote, go to File, Record Slideshow.

While the audio plays, click through your slides. This is getting the slide change time down.

5) From Keynote, go to File, Export. Make sure to have the following settings:

Playback Uses: Recorded Timing Include audio (sound files, movie audio): NOT SELECTED Include the slideshow soundtrack: NOT SELECTED Include the slideshow recording: SELECTED!!!

Click next and your Keynote presentation should export to a .mov file (keep in mind, this .mov file has no audio. we'll take care of that in the last steps).

6)Open the new .mov Keynote presentation in Quicktime Pro.

7) Open the original .mp3 sound file in Quicktime Pro.

8) Select All of the .mp3 file and then click CTRL + C to copy it.

9) Go back to the .mov Keynote file and Select All. Then go up to Edit > Add to Movie.

This adds your sound and movie file together.

10) Finally click on File > Save As. Select, Save As A Self-Contained Movie and you're done.

I Hope This Helps!

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Regarding @rich's suggestion... if you don't have Quicktime, will iMovie work instead? Or some other program?

  1. Create your Keynote presentation.

  2. Record your speaking part (separately) with an audio recording program. I recommend Audacity. It's a great free application. You can download Audacity from www.sorceforge.com among other places. You'll also want to get the Audacity LIB file that is needed to export your audio recording to .mp3.

  3. From the Keynote Inspector, under the Document tab, go to the audio section and add your new voice recording file to the soundtrack.

  4. From Keynote, go to File, Record Slideshow. While the audio plays, click through your slides. This is getting the slide change time down.

  5. From Keynote, go to File, Export. Make sure to have the following settings:

    Playback Uses: Recorded Timing

    Include audio (sound files, movie audio): NOT SELECTED

    Include the slideshow soundtrack: NOT SELECTED

    Include the slideshow recording: SELECTED

    Click next and your Keynote presentation should export to a .mov file (keep in mind, this .mov file has no audio. We'll take care of that in the last steps).

  6. Open the new .mov Keynote presentation in Quicktime Pro.

  7. Open the original .mp3 sound file in Quicktime Pro.

  8. Select All of the .mp3 file and then click CTRL + C to copy it.

  9. Go back to the .mov Keynote file and Select All. Then go up to Edit > Add to Movie. This adds your sound and movie file together.

  10. Finally click on File > Save As. Select Save As A Self-Contained Movie and you're done.

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BTW, who is Rich?? –  Eugene S Oct 24 '13 at 1:47
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