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I have a video file (30Mb) in some unknown format, hex dump of its header looks like this:

0000000    78  55  52  30  09  10  02  0a  00  00  09  09  22  93  00  39
0000020    00  00  00  00  bd  09  a4  00  a4  00  a4  00  a4  00  1c  00
0000040    24  00  00  00  00  00  8d  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  a3  00
0000060    00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00
*
0002560    00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  24  24  24  24  24  24  0f  23

I have a first frame of that video in BMP format, so I can compare encoded and decoded bytes. The only thing I came up to is that one pixel (RBGA) is encoded to one byte. So some kind if YUV encoding is used (?).

Also there are misterios 6 same bytes before each line and 7 after =) and header is 100 bytes long.

For example first line of pixels in video

0002560    00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  24  24  24  24  24  24  0f  23
0002600    10  22  0f  20  0f  20  0d  21  0e  21  0e  21  0e  1f  0e  1f
0002620    0d  1e  0e  1f  0c  1d  0d  1c  0c  1c  0c  0c  0c  0c  0c  0c
0002640    0c  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00  00

Corresponds to first line in BMP.

3960   00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0e 48 43 0e 48 43 0e 48 43 00 45
3980   42 00 45 42 00 40 43 00 3c 40 00 3d 3d 00 3e 3d 00 3f 3d 00
4000   42 40 00 42 40 00 41 43 00 42 40 00 40 43 00 3e 3d 00 3a 3a
4020   00 3a 3a 00 3a 3a 00 37 35 00 37 35 00 37 35 00 3a 3a 00 36
4040   39 00 32 36 00 30 35 00 31 35 00 30 30 02 30 31 02 30 31 00
4060   00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

I thought maybe my video's format is not custom and I could detect it with file or ffmpeg but both knew nothing about it.

So me questions are:

  1. Maybe you know what format that video has?
  2. Maybe there are tools to find it out?
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migrated from stackoverflow.com Mar 2 '12 at 17:17

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

    
But, where do you got that file? –  Juan Mellado Feb 27 '12 at 11:26
    
It is video from capsule for wireless capsule endoscopy. –  alexanderkuk Feb 27 '12 at 18:27
    
Does this violate HIPAA? –  Peter Feb 28 '12 at 4:04
    
I think it does not since I do not provide you a name of a patient. I do not know it actually =) –  alexanderkuk Feb 29 '12 at 16:37
1  
use a video player like KMPlayer, play the file and check the video and audio codec being used. –  Bahamut Mar 2 '12 at 15:57

4 Answers 4

Since this is medical image it can be in DCIM format or it could be in some vendor proprietary format.

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If you want to identify video / audio file i recommend you to download K-Lite codec pack. It always works for me.

http://www.codecguide.com/changelogs_full.htm "•Updated MediaInfo Lite to version 0.7.53"

MediaInfo - that's the one you can use, after installing it's just right clicking on the file or opening it and it should be recognized, via the tray icons (if not disabled) you can change various layout and information settings.

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I don't think it can be guess. No ftyp tag in the head, so ffmpeg can't probe it. You need to recapture it and save the header.

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Maybe the mysterious bytes correspond to packet number/header/end? Hence, maybe the file you have is a streaming video file? Try Realtime, Quicktime and VLC players.

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Quicktime and VLC did not help. I think I can not run Realtime under MacOS X. –  alexanderkuk Feb 27 '12 at 18:31

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