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I recently was crawling through old boxes and came across my grandfather's old Canon Zoom 518-2 Super 8 video camera. Inside was a cartridge of AGFA Moviechrome 40 film. I'm wondering where/how I'd go about getting this developed and was wondering if anyone had any suggestions?

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You could try giving Film Rescue International a go. Their FAQ predicts the results of Moviechrome to be on "poor" quality level, and people seem to agree.

There's also Rocky Mountain in US; Process C-22 and FotoStation in UK.

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Thanks four your answer, Imre. I got in touch with Film Rescue International. Their prices seem pretty reasonable. Have you had any first-hand expereience with them? –  speedRS Dec 21 '11 at 3:11

AGFA 40 film is from the 70's and film processing has changed a huge amount since then, and I don't think the old processing even exist anymore (in shops or repo centers) Instead of trying to replicae the old proceess the developers will just process as they would B&W film.

If they do this (which is very likely) then you will end up with very flat and grainy images that unless they have some value wont be worth looking at.

However as with this type of thing curiosity is a very funny thing and i'm sure I would just give it a go to see what comes out.

(p.s this question is slightly off topic as it is about videography)

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