Take the 2-minute tour ×
Video Production Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for engineers, producers, editors, and enthusiasts spanning the fields of video, and media creation. It's 100% free, no registration required.

(Note: the video is a screencast hence the desktop icons, that's not actually the desktop of the machine having the error.)

enter image description here

We are using JWPlayer, and we rarely have this issue, but on it is frequently reported by customers and becoming a repeat issue. We've had them update their Flash player to the latest version. What causes this? My guess is codecs or video driver issues but I am not sure how to fix.

share|improve this question
1  
".mp4" doesn't tell us anything about the codec. (See this question, asked just recently.) –  leftaroundabout Sep 12 '11 at 21:59
    
Does the problem go away when a keyframe pops up? I've seen this quite a bit, always due to video corruption. The problem should go away on the next keyframe. If it doesn't, something else is likely wrong. –  Brad Sep 13 '11 at 16:40
    
@leftaroundabout sadly I don't know anything about the codec, but I was curious to know if it might be a codec issue –  ioSamurai Sep 13 '11 at 20:44
    
You can see what codec it is when you open it in, for instance, VLC. –  leftaroundabout Sep 13 '11 at 20:48

2 Answers 2

This has nothing to do really with Codec. Even if the stream is fully corrupt, the media player needs to portray only such things within the UI window.

This could be most likely a device driver or software dependency with player having issue. try alternative players.

share|improve this answer

Put keyframe distance in the encoding options to KEY EVERY FRAME.

When you export in the export options you have keyframe distance, which is used to calculate "intermediate key points/key frames", and the default is 25/30 frames. The player calculates pixels and frames inbetween keyframes. Sometimes it gets lost in calculation because of lost bits or bytes. Having less distance between keyframes reduces the chance of this, and results in more accurate frame rendering.

share|improve this answer
    
I've edited your comment into your answer (and removed our now-outdated comments), so that the answer is much clearer. In general this is a better place to put explanation, since it's easier to read and the comments aren't really "part" of the answer anyway - just associated with it. If I've made any error, please do edit the question to fix it. –  Warrior Bob Oct 27 '11 at 17:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.