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Sure, I could Google and find random software. But I rather have the opinion of users that have had hands-on with any open source video editors.

So if you've used one that you like or know of any, please let me know and state whether you've used it or just know of it (and heard good things). Thanks.

I'm looking for Windows software. But you may suggest Linux as well for other people that might stumble upon this.

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I tried some and it's hard to find one that is free, well documented and that works perfectly. Especially on Windows. You should tell which operating system you use. –  Julien N Sep 8 '11 at 0:30
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I think you are looking for "free" and not "open source". –  koan Jun 26 '12 at 8:41
    
@koan Well I'm a developer so I may want to contribute to a video editor that I deem worthy of my time :D –  Tek 2 days ago
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10 Answers 10

VLMC is a non-linear multitrack editor. It's based on VLC and inherits a pretty vast format compatibility from that. The UI is a little rough, but it gets the job done.

Lightworks is a more recent project and seems polished. It's rooted in broadcast editing, so a large number of familiar codecs are unsupported. It supports Matrox codecs, which you have to install separately, so you'll have to convert your video to Matrox AVIs first.

Avidemux is a simple editor, good for trimming and small tasks. In my experience, not very stable on Windows, OK on Linux.

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+1 for Lightworks. I switched from FCP to Lightworks a year ago and love it. It's very full-featured; many feature films have been cut on it, including Pulp Fiction and Braveheart, and more recently, The King's Speech and Hugo. –  VolcanoLotus Aug 24 '12 at 17:48
    
Note that Lightworks is not open-source currently, but open-sourcing it is on the roadmap. –  naxa Nov 4 '12 at 12:40
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You might want to see Wikipedia's Comparison of video editors and list of video editing software. From my personal experience I recommend Kdenlive over any others. It has good support for a wide range of non-linear video editing functions. If you are the real geek, you may want to try out Cinelera.

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I personally run Cinelerra CV and it's "mochup" Cinecutie on my Linux boxes.

Cinelerra (and it's relatives) can do some very sophisticated editing work, but they aren't the easiest to use. Luckily, there are lots of video tutorials out there to help you.

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There is an Linux/Gnome based video editor called PiTiVi which is working close with the GStreamer multimedia framework which is used by most Linux distributions. The PiTiVi project has been slow moving because of their development philosophy which is "upstream first". Challenges they encounter in GStreamer means that they work with GStreamer to solve the issue instead of working around the framework.

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For Linux people:

Kino

It is a non-linear DV editor. It has many features including capture, editing, FX, and export to other formats.

I've used it for several years without issue.

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Kdenlive is rapidly becoming the most advanced Open Source video editor for Linux.

As a Windows user, you can download a live CD of Kdenlive. Burn it to a CD, and then it will boot up into a Linux system for you. Or, you could install Virtual Box on Windows (again, free software) and then install the live CD to that. This would allow you to simultaneously use Kdenlive and your Windows system and share file systems between then.

I use Kdenlive often on my Linux system. It has an active development team that are very responsive to new feature requests and bug reports. The user community is also very friendly and supportive.

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If you're on Linux, consider Cinelerra: the most powerful video editor for Linux, Openshot: simple, powerful, and free video editor for Linux, or Kdenlive (also available for FreeBSD and Mac OSX): Free and open source video editor for GUN/Linux and FreeBSD

Openshot and Kdenlive can be installed via apt-get install, however Cinelerra requires a little more configuration

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A friend of mine liked VirtualDub quite a bit, which is free. I have not, however, used it myself.

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VirtualDub used with AviSynth is a good combination. –  koan Sep 22 '11 at 15:44
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Novacut just got backed by $25,000 on KickStarter and is gaining traction fast, I am super excited about this one. It's not available yet, but it's dmedia component looks super useful.

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Still not available :-( –  Vincent Apr 9 '12 at 14:01
    
Yes, actually it has been available for some time on the launchpad page, you can install it in ubuntu with a ppa. launchpad.net/novacut –  Wind Up Toy May 5 '12 at 3:36
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OpenShot is easy to use. Only for Linux.

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Could you maybe elaborate on why it is easy to use? Is there a good manual? Intuitive user interface? Other good/bad things the software has? Please add some more detail to your answer. –  Bart Arondson Oct 22 '12 at 21:36
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